1991 SUPREME AWARD Pallas Athene. by Donna Demente.  Three years after graduating from Auckland’s Elam School of Fine Art, Donna Demente won the 1991 Supreme WOW Award. Her entry was heavily influenced by medieval art and extreme close-up portraiture, with the emphasis on eyes.

1991 SUPREME AWARD Pallas Athene. by Donna Demente. Three years after graduating from Auckland’s Elam School of Fine Art, Donna Demente won the 1991 Supreme WOW Award. Her entry was heavily influenced by medieval art and extreme close-up portraiture, with the emphasis on eyes.

In 1999, Simon Hames took wearable art to the next level by creating wearable chairs. His mischievous and fun pair of opossum fur chairs Superminx earned him the Supreme WOW Award title for that year.

In Simon Hames took wearable art to the next level by creating wearable chairs. His mischievous and fun pair of opossum fur chairs Superminx earned him the Supreme WOW Award title for that year.

A visit to the WOW car museum sparked Sarah Thomas’ imagination after she encountered a red 1950's American roadster. Inspired by the tall tail fins, extravagant bumpers and layers of chrome, Sarah created her own wearable art classic “American Dream” for the 2009 show. #Celebrating25Years

A visit to the WOW car museum sparked Sarah Thomas’ imagination after she encountered a red 1950's American roadster. Inspired by the tall tail fins, extravagant bumpers and layers of chrome, Sarah created her own wearable art classic “American Dream” for the 2009 show. #Celebrating25Years

2004 – EOS, Claire Prebble, Golden Bay At the tender age of 18, Claire Prebble became the youngest ever winner of the Supreme Award in 2004, a record which still stands today. Weta Workshop admired her talents and took Claire on board, allowing her to work on major movie productions such as Avatar and Prince Caspian.   Isn’t it great to see young Kiwis making their mark on the World? #Celebrating25Years

Off the Wall - WearableArt Up Close touring exhibition. EOS, Claire Prebble, New Zealand

‘Loops’ by Indian designers Yogesh Chaudhary and Manas Barve is a rather unique design. The 2010 Supreme Award winning garment was made entirely of merino wool to highlight the importance of sustainability. To find out more, click here: http://worldofwearableart.com/news/entry/loops-singularly-strong/ #Celebrating25Years

‘Loops’ by Indian designers Yogesh Chaudhary and Manas Barve i

Susan Holmes is a prolific WOW designer. She has entered garments into the show since WOW’s inception in 1987 and has been winning awards for her brilliance ever since. Her creation ‘Dragonfish’ made of split cane and dyed silk, won the Supreme award in 1996.

Susan Holmes is a prolific WOW designer. She has entered garments into the show since WOW’s inception in 1987 and has been winning awards for her brilliance ever since. Her creation ‘Dragonfish’ made of split cane and dyed silk, won the Supreme award in

Back in 2002, the WOW stage was graced by none other than former Prime Minister, Helen Clark! She is pictured here in the garment “Crest of The Wave”, an exhibition garment created by Susan Holmes for the 2002 Air New Zealand South Pacific section.   Were you there? #Celebrating25Years

Back in 2002, the WOW stage was graced by none other than former Prime Minister, Helen Clark! She is pictured here in the garment “Crest of The Wave”, an exhibition garment created by Susan Holmes for the 2002 Air New Zealand South Pacific section. Were you there? #Celebrating25Years

“My career began when I won the World of WearableArt Supreme Award in 1994, with my design Magpie. Three months later I found myself in Saudi Arabia, designing fashion for the royal families as part of the couture design team of Arushi Fashion.” - Mandi Kingsbury

“My career began when I won the World of WearableArt Supreme Award in 1994, with my design Magpie. Three months later I found myself in Saudi Arabia, designing fashion for the royal families as part of the couture design team of Arushi Fashion.” - Mandi Kingsbury

‘A Nightmare Near By’ from UK designer Siu Ping Wan was anything but a nightmare at the 2011 show. The unique garment was inspired by bed bugs, dust mites and dead skin of all things and was recognised for its creative excellence.

‘A Nightmare Near By’ from UK designer Siu Ping Wan was anything but a nightmare at the 2011 show. The unique garment was inspired by bed bugs, dust mites and dead skin of all things and was recognised for its creative excellence.

“While the entries in that first show were patchy, in between the hand knitted cardies were flashes of brilliance. But the audience had been captured by the idea of art being translated into the three dimensional to adorn the body.” – Dame Suzie Moncrieff.

“While the entries in that first show were patchy, in between the hand knitted cardies were flashes of brilliance. But the audience had been captured by the idea of art being translated into the three dimensional to adorn the body.” – Dame Suzie Moncrieff.


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Wearable chairs bySimon Hames  Love the shape and weirdness of these chairs it is this and not the object that is my inspiration in this case :-)   #AirNZWOW

In Simon Hames took wearable art to the next level by creating wearable chairs. His mischievous and fun pair of opossum fur chairs Superminx earned him the Supreme WOW Award title for that year.

Susan Holmes is a prolific WOW designer. She has entered garments into the show since WOW’s inception in 1987 and has been winning awards for her brilliance ever since. Her creation ‘Dragonfish’ made of split cane and dyed silk, won the Supreme award in 1996.

Susan Holmes is a prolific WOW designer. She has entered garments into the show since WOW’s inception in 1987 and has been winning awards for her brilliance ever since. Her creation ‘Dragonfish’ made of split cane and dyed silk, won the Supreme award in

Mark Crocker’s 1997 sci-fi inspired entry, “Shopping with a Vengeance”, made entirely of recycled kitchen utensils and fittings. It’s still a masterpiece 16 years later and one of Dame Suzie Moncrieff’s personal favourites.

Mark Crocker’s 1997 sci-fi inspired entry, “Shopping with a Vengeance”, made entirely of recycled kitchen utensils and fittings. It’s still a masterpiece 16 years later and one of Dame Suzie Moncrieff’s personal favourites.

“My career began when I won the World of WearableArt Supreme Award in 1994, with my design Magpie. Three months later I found myself in Saudi Arabia, designing fashion for the royal families as part of the couture design team of Arushi Fashion.” - Mandi Kingsbury

“My career began when I won the World of WearableArt Supreme Award in 1994, with my design Magpie. Three months later I found myself in Saudi Arabia, designing fashion for the royal families as part of the couture design team of Arushi Fashion.” - Mandi Kingsbury

‘Hobgoblin’ was a part of the United Video Children’s’ section in 1997. He was designed by the WOW Art Department. All of the show’s props were built at Port Nelson and then reassembled at the Trafalgar Centre. Interestingly, the winner of the children’s section that year won a year’s supply of VCR videos!

‘Hobgoblin’ was a part of the United Video Children’s’ section in 1997. He was designed by the WOW Art Department. All of the show’s props were built at Port Nelson and then reassembled at the Trafalgar Centre. Interestingly, the winner of the children’s section that year won a year’s supply of VCR videos!

“While the entries in that first show were patchy, in between the hand knitted cardies were flashes of brilliance. But the audience had been captured by the idea of art being translated into the three dimensional to adorn the body.” – Dame Suzie Moncrieff.

“While the entries in that first show were patchy, in between the hand knitted cardies were flashes of brilliance. But the audience had been captured by the idea of art being translated into the three dimensional to adorn the body.” – Dame Suzie Moncrieff.

In 1990 WOW’s popularity was tested with the move to Nelson’s Trafalgar Centre. It was a huge risk. Essentially a sports complex, the venue was totally unsuitable. The acoustics were bad, the layout was like a large aircraft hangar and the stage was constructed from apple bins and borrowed MDF board. However, the result was a sell-out success.

In 1990 WOW’s popularity was tested with the move to Nelson’s Trafalgar Centre. It was a huge risk. Essentially a sports complex, the venue was totally unsuitable. The acoustics were bad, the layout was like a large aircraft hangar and the stage was constructed from apple bins and borrowed MDF board. However, the result was a sell-out success.

Celebrating 25 Years

Celebrating 25 Years

Wearable art rebels against the mundane

Onstage - American Express Open Section. 2011 Brancott Estate WOW® Awards Show

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