Manuka is one of the youngest entries in the book of aromatherapy, as its uses in aromatherapy are discovered quite recently. But its medicinal uses were known since long among the original inhabitants of New Zealand, to which this tree is a native. The health benefits of Manuka Essential Oil can be attributed to its properties like anti dandruff, antidote to insect bites and stings, anti bacterial, anti fungal, anti inflammatory, anti histaminic, anti allergenic. cicatrisant, etc.

Manuka is one of the youngest entries in the book of aromatherapy, as its uses in aromatherapy are discovered quite recently. But its medicinal uses were known since long among the original inhabitants of New Zealand, to which this tree is a native. The health benefits of Manuka Essential Oil can be attributed to its properties like anti dandruff, antidote to insect bites and stings, anti bacterial, anti fungal, anti inflammatory, anti histaminic, anti allergenic. cicatrisant, etc.

A favorite vegetable called "Kopakopa" used primarily as a first aid remedy. Like most plants and shrubs, Maori always found a way to fully utilize the products of nature for food, health, healing and protection. Our task today is to remember which ones did what, why and how.

A favorite vegetable called "Kopakopa" used primarily as a first aid remedy. Like most plants and shrubs, Maori always found a way to fully utilize the products of nature for food, health, healing and protection. Our task today is to remember which ones did what, why and how.

This is the Kawakawa plant that is a medicine, a healing and soothing plant when heated and the leaves applied to the body, a flavouring, and tonic drink thirst quencher that is superb to relax and enjoy the aromas of nature that the early Maori would enjoy.

This is the Kawakawa plant that is a medicine, a healing and soothing plant when heated and the leaves applied to the body, a flavouring, and tonic drink thirst quencher that is superb to relax and enjoy the aromas of nature that the early Maori would enjoy.

Kōwhai    The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back.  A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Kōwhai The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back. A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Kūmarahou    Most medicinal uses of kūmarahou were recorded in the 1900s.    The leaves were boiled and used as a soothing and healing agent.  The juice of the leaves was also used in baths.  Drinking the liquid in which leaves had been boiled was said to be good for rheumatism and asthma.

Kūmarahou Most medicinal uses of kūmarahou were recorded in the 1900s. The leaves were boiled and used as a soothing and healing agent. The juice of the leaves was also used in baths. Drinking the liquid in which leaves had been boiled was said to be good for rheumatism and asthma.

Rātā    The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion.  A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses.  The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery.  Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

How traditional Maori herbs are still relevant today- The unique therapeutic properties of New Zealand’s native herbs were recognised and developed by Maori as part of a complex system of traditional medicine and healing. The healing potential of these plants and this knowledge is as relevant today as it ever was

How traditional Maori herbs are still relevant today- The unique therapeutic properties of New Zealand’s native herbs were recognised and developed by Maori as part of a complex system of traditional medicine and healing. The healing potential of these plants and this knowledge is as relevant today as it ever was


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manuka flower I am looking forward to be receiving a bottle of Manuka Essential oil from Young Living. If you want to have one too just message me for details. My link to order as wholesale allows you to have 24% off what a customer would pay and you have automatic membership to order whenever you want at that discount. yl.pe/wt8 link to my member/sponsor number. Link to product https://www.youngliving.com/en_US/products/manuka-5ml

manuka flower I am looking forward to be receiving a bottle of Manuka Essential oil from Young Living. If you want to have one too just message me for details. My link to order as wholesale allows you to have 24% off what a customer would pay and you have automatic membership to order whenever you want at that discount. yl.pe/wt8 link to my member/sponsor number. Link to product https://www.youngliving.com/en_US/products/manuka-5ml

Koromiko    Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease.  Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Koromiko Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease. Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Medicinal Native Plants of New Zealand

Maori Rongoa

Makomako,  Parts used: Leaves and Bark , used for treating burns, from fire or scalding water. The bark or the leaves could be used as a poultice or as a wash. Contains tanic acid, giving it astringent properties. Good for sore eyes and used as a poultice or internally taken as a treatment for rheumatism.Leaves were steeped in hot baths for arthritis and rheumatism.The colonial settlers ate the fruit, made a jelly from the fruit and also a wine, perhaps giving it its common name “wineberry”.

Makomako, Parts used: Leaves and Bark , used for treating burns, from fire or scalding water. The bark or the leaves could be used as a poultice or as a wash. Contains tanic acid, giving it astringent properties. Good for sore eyes and used as a poultice or internally taken as a treatment for rheumatism.Leaves were steeped in hot baths for arthritis and rheumatism.The colonial settlers ate the fruit, made a jelly from the fruit and also a wine, perhaps giving it its common name “wineberry”.

Poroporo,Parts used; berries, leaves, inner bark.The berries are poisonous when eaten green but safe when ripe. The leaf was used for the itch, a poultice for sores, chronic eczema, and psoriasis,sores and ulcers.Internally as an effective contraceptive. A factory was established at Waitara in 1978 for extracting the steroid hormone extract to be added to contraceptive pills and for treating rheumatoid arthritis however the plant closed in 1981.

Poroporo,Parts used; berries, leaves, inner bark.The berries are poisonous when eaten green but safe when ripe. The leaf was used for the itch, a poultice for sores, chronic eczema, and psoriasis,sores and ulcers.Internally as an effective contraceptive. A factory was established at Waitara in 1978 for extracting the steroid hormone extract to be added to contraceptive pills and for treating rheumatoid arthritis however the plant closed in 1981.

Rātā    The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion.  A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses.  The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery.  Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

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