More ideas from ToTT
B

Designspiration is the hub for discovering great art, design, architecture, photography, typography and web inspiration.

This is an example of crystallographic balance. The pattern of windows along the building creates a balance, bringing the design together.

This is an example of crystallographic balance. The pattern of windows along the building creates a balance, bringing the design together.

Crystallographic Balance

Crystallographic Balance

Balance: Crystallographic

Balance: Crystallographic

Crystallographic Balance

Crystallographic Balance

A wallpaper group (or plane symmetry group or plane crystallographic group) is a mathematical classification of a two-dimensional repetitive pattern, based on the symmetries in the pattern. Such patterns occur frequently in architecture and decorative art. There are 17 possible distinct groups. (Example of Wallpaper group type p4m. From The Grammar of Ornament (1856), by Owen Jones. Nineveh & Persia No 2 (plate 13), image #13.) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallpaper_group

A wallpaper group (or plane symmetry group or plane crystallographic group) is a mathematical classification of a two-dimensional repetitive pattern, based on the symmetries in the pattern. Such patterns occur frequently in architecture and decorative art. There are 17 possible distinct groups. (Example of Wallpaper group type p4m. From The Grammar of Ornament (1856), by Owen Jones. Nineveh & Persia No 2 (plate 13), image #13.) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallpaper_group

Wallpaper group  Example of an Egyptian design with wallpaper group p4m A wallpaper group (or plane symmetry group or plane crystallographic group) is a mathematical classification of a two-dimensional repetitive pattern, based on the symmetries in the pattern. Such patterns occur frequently in architecture and decorative art. There are 17 possible distinct groups

Wallpaper group Example of an Egyptian design with wallpaper group p4m A wallpaper group (or plane symmetry group or plane crystallographic group) is a mathematical classification of a two-dimensional repetitive pattern, based on the symmetries in the pattern. Such patterns occur frequently in architecture and decorative art. There are 17 possible distinct groups