Richard Francis

Richard Francis

1157 Arawa St, Rotorua, NZ / Moko Artist Richie Francis www.facebook.com/toiariki www.instagram.com/toiariki Snapchat: toiariki +64 21 483 272 toiariki@yahoo.com $150-$200 per handspan
Richard Francis
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Moko Stencils Kapahaka

Moko Stencils Kapahaka

Actual Head late 19th c. Maori carved head displaying distinctive moko (facial tattoos) (Auckland, Auckland Institute and Museum); photo credit: Werner Forman/Art Resource, NY

Actual Head late 19th c. Maori carved head displaying distinctive moko (facial tattoos) (Auckland, Auckland Institute and Museum); photo credit: Werner Forman/Art Resource, NY

Maori tattoos are part of the culture of the indeigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Maori facial tattoos never cross the midline of the face and are tribal in design. Originally used to instill fear in invaders, it became a status symbol within the culture.

Maori tattoos are part of the culture of the indeigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Maori facial tattoos never cross the midline of the face and are tribal in design. Originally used to instill fear in invaders, it became a status symbol within the culture.

Maori woman. The permanent blue stain on a Maori woman’s tattooed mouth symbolized female beauty among her people in New Zealand. The personal facial tattoo, or moko, communicated her lineage, social position, and marriage eligibility. Photograph from Iles Photo/submitted by Chas J. Glidden, circa 1919

Maori woman. The permanent blue stain on a Maori woman’s tattooed mouth symbolized female beauty among her people in New Zealand. The personal facial tattoo, or moko, communicated her lineage, social position, and marriage eligibility. Photograph from Iles Photo/submitted by Chas J. Glidden, circa 1919

Beautiful Maori Wahine (woman) from New Zealand - wearing the traditional Moko or chin tattoo. Before modern tattoo machines this was done with a sharp shell or stone and a small hammer.

Beautiful Maori Wahine (woman) from New Zealand - wearing the traditional Moko or chin tattoo. Before modern tattoo machines this was done with a sharp shell or stone and a small hammer.