King Tāwhiao. A portait of the 2nd Maori King, a leader of great mana, held in a high degree of tapu or sacredness and restriction.

King Tāwhiao. A portait of the 2nd Maori King, a leader of great mana, held in a high degree of tapu or sacredness and restriction.

Hinenuitepo - Goddess of the Night /// There is only one female god in Maori Legend. She is the daughter of Tane Mahuta, god of the Forest and Birds, and Hineahuone, woman made from earth. Today She is known as Hinenuitepo but she began life as Hinetitama, the Dawn Maiden.

Hinenuitepo - Goddess of the Night /// There is only one female god in Maori Legend. She is the daughter of Tane Mahuta, god of the Forest and Birds, and Hineahuone, woman made from earth. Today She is known as Hinenuitepo but she began life as Hinetitama, the Dawn Maiden.

E HOKI MAI-(the home coming)  The journey of the Maori is seen by many as the return to the land where they came from. The bond to Papatuanuku (mother earth) is strongest for women. Red is the colour of blood and earth - the most sacred colour for Maori people. Women are the most vulnerable and carry the seed of the spirit. Men who have lost the bond to Papatuanuku can regain it in togetherness with women.

E HOKI MAI-(the home coming) The journey of the Maori is seen by many as the return to the land where they came from. The bond to Papatuanuku (mother earth) is strongest for women. Red is the colour of blood and earth - the most sacred colour for Maori people. Women are the most vulnerable and carry the seed of the spirit. Men who have lost the bond to Papatuanuku can regain it in togetherness with women.

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her newborn son, who floats on the ocean. Above her the baby lies on his mother's hair. When he was stillborn she set him into the sea wrapped in her tikitiki, a topknot of hair. Māui became known as Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. On one side of Taranga Māui, as a kererū, looks down on his father, and on her other side are Māui's brothers. In this tradition, Māui washed ashore and was raised by his grandfather.

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her newborn son, who floats on the ocean. Above her the baby lies on his mother's hair. When he was stillborn she set him into the sea wrapped in her tikitiki, a topknot of hair. Māui became known as Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. On one side of Taranga Māui, as a kererū, looks down on his father, and on her other side are Māui's brothers. In this tradition, Māui washed ashore and was raised by his grandfather.

Tawhirimatea- Maori myth: the god of the weather, lighting, thunder, wind, clouds, and storms. He became angry at his brothers for separating their parents so he battled and defeated them except his brother that represented war and humans.

Tawhirimatea- Maori myth: the god of the weather, lighting, thunder, wind, clouds, and storms. He became angry at his brothers for separating their parents so he battled and defeated them except his brother that represented war and humans.

Rongo and Haumia- Maori myth: the god of cultivated food and the god of wild food. They were brothers and both attacked by their other brother, the storm god. They hid in the body of Papa, Mother Earth.

Rongo and Haumia- Maori myth: the god of cultivated food and the god of wild food. They were brothers and both attacked by their other brother, the storm god. They hid in the body of Papa, Mother Earth.

Maori Princess by Gottfried Lindauer.  Love the cross culture imagery.

Maori Princess by Gottfried Lindauer. Love the cross culture imagery.

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