Nga rakau

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A maripi is a Maori weapon comprised of a wooden paddle with shark teeth inbedded into the cutting edge.

A maripi is a Maori weapon comprised of a wooden paddle with shark teeth inbedded into the cutting edge.

Photograph (black and white), from an album; three Maori carved wooden knives, each edged with shark's teeth. Gelatin silver print

Photograph (black and white), from an album; three Maori carved wooden knives, each edged with shark's teeth. Gelatin silver print

Maori short hand-club weapons are designed for close quarter combat and used in a jabbing or striking motion with intent to kill or maim (and then kill) with a blow to the skull. From top left, clockwise - Mere, (mere pounamu/greenstone mere) was the exclusive name of the weapon made of pounamu in some regions but other regions had a broader meaning which included the similar patu weapons made from bone, stone and hardwood. Greenstone clubs sometimes absorbed blood into tiny fissures leaving…

Maori short hand-club weapons are designed for close quarter combat and used in a jabbing or striking motion with intent to kill or maim (and then kill) with a blow to the skull. From top left, clockwise - Mere, (mere pounamu/greenstone mere) was the exclusive name of the weapon made of pounamu in some regions but other regions had a broader meaning which included the similar patu weapons made from bone, stone and hardwood. Greenstone clubs sometimes absorbed blood into tiny fissures leaving…

maori objet de prestige | weapon | sotheby's pf1438lot6vcfren

maori objet de prestige | weapon | sotheby's pf1438lot6vcfren

Patiti, deeply carved handle with early trade blade attached.

Patiti, deeply carved handle with early trade blade attached.

Patiti, deeply carved handle with early trade blade attached.

Patiti, deeply carved handle with early trade blade attached.

Samuel Charles Brees, 1810-1865: [Study of carved axe-handle between 1842-1845] A carefully-detailed Maori carved handle with wooden inserts and a European axe-head.

Samuel Charles Brees, 1810-1865: [Study of carved axe-handle between 1842-1845] A carefully-detailed Maori carved handle with wooden inserts and a European axe-head.

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