Potiki Preview

Potiki Preview

Google Maps of New Zealand. Walk around Patricia Grace's hometown in Waikanae.

Google Maps of New Zealand. Walk around Patricia Grace's hometown in Waikanae.

TANGI: The term tangi or tangihanga describes a Māori approach to the process of grieving for someone who has died. Practices and protocols can differ from tribe to tribe. However, it is a common process that enables people to express their sense of loss, not only for their loved one, but for those who have passed before them. Read more at: http://www.korero.maori.nz/forlearners/protocols/tangi.html

TANGI: The term tangi or tangihanga describes a Māori approach to the process of grieving for someone who has died. Practices and protocols can differ from tribe to tribe. However, it is a common process that enables people to express their sense of loss, not only for their loved one, but for those who have passed before them. Read more at: http://www.korero.maori.nz/forlearners/protocols/tangi.html

MAORI CREATION STORY: Indigenous artist, Marcus Winter, tells the Māori creation story using Sand Art. In the Māori worldview, the world began with the violent separation of Ranginui, the Sky Father, and Papatuanuku, the Earth Mother, by their children, including Tūmatauenga (similar to Kū), Tāne (Kāne), Rongo (Lono, god of cultivated food), and Tangaroa (Kanaloa, the god of the sea).

MAORI CREATION STORY: Indigenous artist, Marcus Winter, tells the Māori creation story using Sand Art. In the Māori worldview, the world began with the violent separation of Ranginui, the Sky Father, and Papatuanuku, the Earth Mother, by their children, including Tūmatauenga (similar to Kū), Tāne (Kāne), Rongo (Lono, god of cultivated food), and Tangaroa (Kanaloa, the god of the sea).

The KORU, which is often used in Māori art as a symbol of creation, is based on the shape of an unfurling fern frond. Its circular shape conveys the idea of perpetual movement, and its inward coil suggests a return to the point of origin. The koru therefore symbolises the way in which life both changes and stays the same.

The KORU, which is often used in Māori art as a symbol of creation, is based on the shape of an unfurling fern frond. Its circular shape conveys the idea of perpetual movement, and its inward coil suggests a return to the point of origin. The koru therefore symbolises the way in which life both changes and stays the same.

The HAKA is a traditional ancestral war cry, dance or challenge from the Māori people of New Zealand. Here it is performed by New Zealand's rugby team, the All Blacks, before one of their matches.

The HAKA is a traditional ancestral war cry, dance or challenge from the Māori people of New Zealand. Here it is performed by New Zealand's rugby team, the All Blacks, before one of their matches.

1975 MĀORI LAND MARCH: In 1975, about 5,000 marchers, led by Whina Cooper, arrived at Parliament and presented a petition signed by 60,000 people to Prime Minister Bill Rowling. The primary aim of the hīkoi (march) was to call for an end to the alienation (sale) of Māori land. Here is a poem by Hone Tuwhare, New Zealand’s most distinguished Maori poet writing in English, about this historic event.

1975 MĀORI LAND MARCH: In 1975, about 5,000 marchers, led by Whina Cooper, arrived at Parliament and presented a petition signed by 60,000 people to Prime Minister Bill Rowling. The primary aim of the hīkoi (march) was to call for an end to the alienation (sale) of Māori land. Here is a poem by Hone Tuwhare, New Zealand’s most distinguished Maori poet writing in English, about this historic event.

Pinterest
Search