Maori and Political activist Tame Iti has a traditional moko tattooed onto his face.

Maori and Political activist Tame Iti has a traditional moko tattooed onto his face.

Tā moko <> Chef Maori - Maori chief with tattoed face wearing peacock feather; between 1860 and 1879

The Maori culture has a long tradition of tattooing, which dated back centuries until the Europeans outlawed it in the 1800s. These Auckland men belong to the anti-European Black Power Group. Their tattoos are a combination of traditional Maori tattoo art, called moko, and symbols picked up from the U.S. Black Power movement of the 1960s.  Picture by Chris Rainer

The Maori culture has a long tradition of tattooing, which dated back centuries until the Europeans outlawed it in the 1800s. These Auckland men belong to the anti-European Black Power Group. Their tattoos are a combination of traditional Maori tattoo art, called moko, and symbols picked up from the U.S. Black Power movement of the 1960s. Picture by Chris Rainer

Maori kids in Gisborne, New Zealand. Photo: Alessandro Saponi

Maori kids in Gisborne, New Zealand. Photo: Alessandro Saponi

Uiga Bashford: Place in Time, The Christchurch Documentary Project

Uiga Bashford: Place in Time, The Christchurch Documentary Project

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