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Henry, 10 year old oyster shucker who does five pots of oyster [sic] a day. Works before school, after school, and Saturdays. Been working three years. Maggioni Canning Co. Port Royal, South Carolina in February 1912.

Henry, 10 year old oyster shucker who does five pots of oyster [sic] a day. Works before school, after school, and Saturdays. Been working three years. Maggioni Canning Co. Port Royal, South Carolina in February (old timey child)

European settlers and enslaved Africans introduced Malaria and other tropical diseases to the Americas. These tropical diseases thrived in the swampy region of the Lowcountry. While many slaves were more resistant, the white planters were not. Therefore, whites moved their homes away from the rice fields and vacated the lowcountry at least during the humid season. For the Lowcountry Gullah, this isolation allowed for the creation and preservation of their distinct African culture.

Gullah Culture Thrived in Desolate Conditions

Mart Payne, 5 years old, picks from 10 to 20 pounds a day. His mother said "Mart, he haint old nuff to go to school much, but he kin pick his 20 pounds a day. Mostly 10 to 15 pounds." - In the rural south it was not uncommon on the small farms for the family members to all go to the fields and pick cotton-white or black, you picked. In the 1950s the going rate for a hundred pounds of cotton was fifty cents - the more you picked, the more you made.

Mart Payne, 5 years old; he haint old nuff to go to school much, but he kin pick his 20 pounds a day. Mostly 10 or 15 pounds." Photographer - Lewis W.

5 generations on Smith’s plantation, Beaufort, SC This family was photographed in 1862 after Union forces captured coastal area of SC. Taken by Timothy O’Sullivan at the J. J. Smith plantation, this picture was exhibited at Alexander Gardner’s Washington, D.C., photography gallery in September 1863. In contrast to this South Carolina family, the history of the slaves was usually marked by efforts of enslaved African Americans to maintain family in the face of forced break-ups and sales.

Four generations of a slave family on Smith’s Plantation, Beaufort, South Carolina, circa 1862 (Timothy H. O'Sullivan) Source: Library of Congress

Exploring Lines, Area, and Perimeter Geometry Wild West Town  The year is 1849 and the setting is the Wild West. Your students task is to create o...

Geometry Activity Project WILD WEST TOWN- Exploring Lines, Area, and Perimeter

Exploring Lines, Area, and Perimeter Geometry Wild West Town The year is 1849 and the setting is the Wild West. Geometry Activity Project WILD WEST TOWN- Exploring Lines, Area, and Perimeter

In the last ten years, Joe Manning has tracked down the life stories of more than 350 child laborers in Lewis Hine's documentary photography for the National Child Labor Committee.  Pictured: Lewis Hine's photograph of 12-year-old Addie Card, a spinner in a Vermont mill, and Addie at age 90. (Courtesy Addie's family)

Tracking Down Lewis Hine's Forgotten Child Laborers

In the last ten years, Joe Manning has tracked down the life stories of more than 350 child laborers in Lewis Hine's documentary photography for the National Child Labor Committee.

7 Harmless (But Slightly Evil) Back-to-School Pranks for Your Gullible Dorm Mates « Practical Jokes & Pranks

How To: 7 Harmless (But Slightly Evil) Back-to-School Pranks for Your Gullible Dorm Mates

Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, the eldest son of James I. Henry died suddenly as a teenager and his younger brother became the unfortunate Charles I.

Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales February 1594 – 6 November was the eldest son of King James I & VI and Anne of Denmark.

Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was a 17 years (in 1942) while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a pic of her on the job. That image used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War II.

People- Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was 17 years (in while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a pic of her on the job. That image used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War.

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