Explore Cloaks, The Boy and more!

Explore related topics

Girls at the local Playcentre, teaching the boys how to play CLOAK OF PROTECTION

Girls at the local Playcentre, teaching the boys how to play CLOAK OF PROTECTION

Weaving is more than just a product of manual skills. From the simple rourou (food basket) to the prestigious kahukiwi (kiwi feather cloak), weaving is endowed with the very essence of the spiritual values of Maori people. The first Maori settlers brought the knowledge of weaving with them. In Aotearoa they found new plant materials, including the versatile harakeke (New Zealand flax). They also incorporated feathers from birds and the skin and hair of their dogs. They wove practical items…

Weaving is more than just a product of manual skills. From the simple rourou (food basket) to the prestigious kahukiwi (kiwi feather cloak), weaving is endowed with the very essence of the spiritual values of Maori people. The first Maori settlers brought the knowledge of weaving with them. In Aotearoa they found new plant materials, including the versatile harakeke (New Zealand flax). They also incorporated feathers from birds and the skin and hair of their dogs. They wove practical items…

The New Zealand Red Admiral is a butterfly that is endemic to New Zealand. The Māori name is kahukura which means red cloak.

The New Zealand Red Admiral is a butterfly that is endemic to New Zealand. The Māori name is kahukura which means red cloak.

Kukupa Tirikātene wears the Tirikātene family cloak. Photograph by Norm Heke, 2008. Te Papa

Kukupa Tirikātene wears the Tirikātene family cloak. Photograph by Norm Heke, 2008. Te Papa

Topic: Kahu huruhuru style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Topic: Kahu huruhuru style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Topic: Kahu huruhuru style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Topic: Kahu huruhuru style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Queen Elizabeth II sports a cloak made of New Zealand bird feathers over her coat. She arrives at the meeting house of the Ngai Tahu, a Maori tribe of the southern islands of New Zealand in 2002.

Queen Elizabeth II sports a cloak made of New Zealand bird feathers over her coat. She arrives at the meeting house of the Ngai Tahu, a Maori tribe of the southern islands of New Zealand in 2002.

Weaver Makurata Paitini (1912–26). Photograph by James McDonald (1865–1935). Te Papa (MA_C.001346)

Weaver Makurata Paitini (1912–26). Photograph by James McDonald (1865–1935). Te Papa (MA_C.001346)

Maori used kiwi feathers chiefly for ceremonial cloaks (kahu-kiwi). Kahu-kiwi are usually named and are reserved for chiefs because they’re considered as taonga(treasures). They are said to carry the wairua(spirit) of the birds themselves. During significant events – incl. deaths, marriages –a kahu-kiwi is drawn over the shoulders as a symbol of chieftainship and high birth. via Somethangz Origiinalz FB

Maori used kiwi feathers chiefly for ceremonial cloaks (kahu-kiwi). Kahu-kiwi are usually named and are reserved for chiefs because they’re considered as taonga(treasures). They are said to carry the wairua(spirit) of the birds themselves. During significant events – incl. deaths, marriages –a kahu-kiwi is drawn over the shoulders as a symbol of chieftainship and high birth. via Somethangz Origiinalz FB

Pinterest
Search