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Photograph taken by @christianziegler . Green amoeba. Barro Colorado Island (BCI) an island in Panamas Lake Gatun is the principle field station of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and arguably the oldest field station in a tropical forest

Photograph taken by @christianziegler . Green amoeba. Barro Colorado Island (BCI) an island in Panamas Lake Gatun is the principle field station of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and arguably the oldest field station in a tropical forest

This blog post describes liana vines, what they are, where they are found and what they do in the tropical rainforest.

This blog post describes liana vines, what they are, where they are found and what they do in the tropical rainforest.

Typical uneven and billowing canopy of a sub tropical rainforest. Dorrigo National Park, New South Wales, Australia. Vines covering the tree tops are prominent in this photo. (Flickr photo by Pete the Poet)

Typical uneven and billowing canopy of a sub tropical rainforest. Dorrigo National Park, New South Wales, Australia. Vines covering the tree tops are prominent in this photo. (Flickr photo by Pete the Poet)

A three-toed sloth with its juvenile in a Cecropia tree, one of its preferred food plants, Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Photo copyright Christian Ziegler.

A three-toed sloth with its juvenile in a Cecropia tree, one of its preferred food plants, Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Photo copyright Christian Ziegler.

A liana is any of various long-stemmed, woody vines that are rooted in the soil at ground level and use trees, as well as other means of vertical support, to climb up to the canopy to get access to well-lit areas of the forest.[1] Lianas are especially characteristic of tropical moist deciduous forests and rainforests, including temperate rainforests. Yes, this is the vine Tarzan would swing from.

A liana is any of various long-stemmed, woody vines that are rooted in the soil at ground level and use trees, as well as other means of vertical support, to climb up to the canopy to get access to well-lit areas of the forest.[1] Lianas are especially characteristic of tropical moist deciduous forests and rainforests, including temperate rainforests. Yes, this is the vine Tarzan would swing from.

A new field guide untangles identification of tropical vines

A new field guide untangles identification of tropical vines

Center For Tropical Forest Science: New field guide describing the lianas of Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama

Center For Tropical Forest Science: New field guide describing the lianas of Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama

The spiral stair case arrangement of the leaves of a wild ginger (Genus Costus) avoids self shading in the dark understory of the rain forest, Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Photo copyright Christian Ziegler.

The spiral stair case arrangement of the leaves of a wild ginger (Genus Costus) avoids self shading in the dark understory of the rain forest, Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Photo copyright Christian Ziegler.

Center For Tropical Forest Science: New field guide describing the lianas of Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama

Center For Tropical Forest Science: New field guide describing the lianas of Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama

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