Researchers from Terra-i and O-Eco's InfoAmazonia team have developed updated forest cover maps for Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, French Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The results reveal a 24 percent increase in forest loss between 2011 and 2012 and an increasing trend since 2004.

Researchers from Terra-i and O-Eco's InfoAmazonia team have developed updated forest cover maps for Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, French Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The results reveal a 24 percent increase in forest loss between 2011 and 2012 and an increasing trend since 2004.

The Amazon Rain Forest (Brazil/Peru). I am going to need about 6 months to travel to all the places I want to see in South America. Chile started an obsession...

The Amazon Rain Forest (Brazil/Peru). I am going to need about 6 months to travel to all the places I want to see in South America. Chile started an obsession...

CITATION: Makarieva, A. M., Gorshkov, V. G., Sheil, D., Nobre, A. D., and Li, B.-L. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 1039-1056, doi:10.5194/acp-13-1039-2013, 2013.  Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0130-hance-physics-biotic-pump.html#lR2atIOD1y9tktXv.99

CITATION: Makarieva, A. M., Gorshkov, V. G., Sheil, D., Nobre, A. D., and Li, B.-L. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 1039-1056, doi:10.5194/acp-13-1039-2013, 2013. Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0130-hance-physics-biotic-pump.html#lR2atIOD1y9tktXv.99

Rainforests that have been affected by even low-intensity fires are far more vulnerable to invasion by grasses, finds a new study published in special issue of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. The findings are significant because they suggest that burned forests may be more susceptible to subsequent fires which may burn more intensely due to increased fuel loads.

Rainforests that have been affected by even low-intensity fires are far more vulnerable to invasion by grasses, finds a new study published in special issue of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. The findings are significant because they suggest that burned forests may be more susceptible to subsequent fires which may burn more intensely due to increased fuel loads.

Proposed Amazon dam attracts illegal loggers, threatens local farmers The Tapajós River, where the Brazilian government plans to build the country’s fourth biggest hydro dam. Photo by Lilo Clareto / Repórter Brasil

Proposed Amazon dam attracts illegal loggers, threatens local farmers The Tapajós River, where the Brazilian government plans to build the country’s fourth biggest hydro dam. Photo by Lilo Clareto / Repórter Brasil

With the launch of a new satellite mapping system on Wednesday, governments and environmentalists will have access to hard evidence of these types of crimes almost in real time as part of a push by scientists to improve monitoring of tropical deforestation.  Tropical forests nearly the size of India are set to be destroyed by 2050 if current trends continue, a study warned last year, causing species loss, displacement and a major increase in climate-changing greenhouse gas emissions.

With the launch of a new satellite mapping system on Wednesday, governments and environmentalists will have access to hard evidence of these types of crimes almost in real time as part of a push by scientists to improve monitoring of tropical deforestation. Tropical forests nearly the size of India are set to be destroyed by 2050 if current trends continue, a study warned last year, causing species loss, displacement and a major increase in climate-changing greenhouse gas emissions.

Destruction of the Amazon rainforest has increased by almost one-third in the past year, reversing a decade-long trend of better protection for the world's greatest rainforest.  Environmentalists blamed a controversial weakening of legal protections passed by President Dilma Rousseff for the increase in deforestation by loggers and farmers. But the environment minister, Izabella Teixeira, rejected this, saying the overall trend was "positive".

Amazon deforestation increased by one-third in past year

Destruction of the Amazon rainforest has increased by almost one-third in the past year, reversing a decade-long trend of better protection for the world's greatest rainforest. Environmentalists blamed a controversial weakening of legal protections passed by President Dilma Rousseff for the increase in deforestation by loggers and farmers. But the environment minister, Izabella Teixeira, rejected this, saying the overall trend was "positive".

For years now there have been fears that the forest was likely to experience a mass die-off of trees because of rising temperatures caused by climatic changes, with rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels a principal cause. But scientists now say the gas is affecting the Amazon in two ways.    It is certainly increasing temperatures, they say, with the risk of droughts and other dangers to arboreal life. But it is also providing an airborne fertiliser.

For years now there have been fears that the forest was likely to experience a mass die-off of trees because of rising temperatures caused by climatic changes, with rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels a principal cause. But scientists now say the gas is affecting the Amazon in two ways. It is certainly increasing temperatures, they say, with the risk of droughts and other dangers to arboreal life. But it is also providing an airborne fertiliser.

As some of us were heading off for the Easter holiday weekend, the Brazilian government was quietly releasing deforestation trends showing an increase in deforestation for the first time in five years.  These numbers use the DETER rapid response satellite system, a system that provides estimates of deforestation rates every month.

As some of us were heading off for the Easter holiday weekend, the Brazilian government was quietly releasing deforestation trends showing an increase in deforestation for the first time in five years. These numbers use the DETER rapid response satellite system, a system that provides estimates of deforestation rates every month.

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