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Russia has reopened the 1918 murder case of Tsar Nicolas II and his family, the Romanovs. The bones of Russia’s last tsar,

Russia has reopened the 1918 murder case of Tsar Nicolas II and his family, the Romanovs. The bones of Russia’s last tsar,

Grand Duchesses Olga (1895-1918), Anastasia (1901-1918), Maria (1899-1918) and Tatiana (1897-1918) Romanova of Russia, daughters of the last Tsar, beautiful and angelic girls brutally murdered on 17th July 1918.    This picture was taken four years prior their deaths

Grand Duchesses Olga (1895-1918), Anastasia (1901-1918), Maria (1899-1918) and Tatiana (1897-1918) Romanova of Russia, daughters of the last Tsar, beautiful and angelic girls brutally murdered on 17th July 1918. This picture was taken four years prior their deaths

Emperatrices de Rusia, las hijas del Zar Nicolás y la Emperatriz Alejandra: OTMA: Olga, Tatiana, María y Anastasia Romanov

Emperatrices de Rusia, las hijas del Zar Nicolás y la Emperatriz Alejandra: OTMA: Olga, Tatiana, María y Anastasia Romanov

Mother and Daughter: Tsaritsa Alexandra and Grand Duchess Maria    In 1910, her fourteen-year-old sister Olga persuaded ten-year-old Maria to write their mother a letter asking that Olga be given her own room and be allowed to let down her dresses. Maria tried to persuade her mother that it was her own idea to write the letter.

Mother and Daughter: Tsaritsa Alexandra and Grand Duchess Maria In 1910, her fourteen-year-old sister Olga persuaded ten-year-old Maria to write their mother a letter asking that Olga be given her own room and be allowed to let down her dresses. Maria tried to persuade her mother that it was her own idea to write the letter.

The Romanov girls, standing up in back from left to right: Maria, Anastasia, Olga. Sitting down, Tatiana.

The Romanov girls, standing up in back from left to right: Maria, Anastasia, Olga. Sitting down, Tatiana.

The Queen's mother-in-law. Princess Alice of Battenberg (1885-1969) was the mother of Prince Philip. She was born deaf, but read lips in several languages. She married Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark in 1903 and had 5 children. Her family was exiled from Greece in 1917. Her later years were devoted to charity and she founded the order of nuns known as the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary.

The Queen's mother-in-law. Princess Alice of Battenberg (1885-1969) was the mother of Prince Philip. She was born deaf, but read lips in several languages. She married Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark in 1903 and had 5 children. Her family was exiled from Greece in 1917. Her later years were devoted to charity and she founded the order of nuns known as the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary.

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