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At 10:22 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 19, 1963, as families arrived to attend services at the church, a thunderous explosion rang out from the basement. 19 sticks of dynamite were planted in the basement of the 16th Street Baptist Church. The blast killed 4 little girls & injured dozens more.Despite a national outcry for justice, - Birmingham, was a place where 50 other racially motivated bombings had gone unsolved over recent decades.

Birmingham~ Bombing of Street Baptist Church killed 4 girls.and years later, justice a long time in coming.

1963 - The 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed as an act of racially motivated terrorism. The explosion at the African-American church, kills four girls and marks a turning point in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. It helps build support for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

1963 - The Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed as an act of racially motivated terrorism. The explosion at the African-American church, kills four girls and marks a turning point in the U. Civil Rights Movement. It helps build s

September 15, 1963 · Birmingham, Alabama Virgil Lamar Ware, 13, was riding on the handlebars of his brother’s bicycle when he was fatally shot by white teenagers. The white youths had come from a segregationist rally held in the aftermath of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing.

Virgil Lamar Ware, was riding on the handlebars of his brother’s bicycle when he was fatally shot by white teenagers. The white youths had come from a segregationist rally held in the aftermath of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing.

Abraham and Mary Lincoln's home in Springfield, IL.

The Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield, IL, features the only home Abraham Lincoln ever owned. The Lincoln family lived here from 1844 until his election to the Presidency in

The Orangeburg massacre is the most common name given to an incident on February 8, 1968, in which nine South Carolina Highway Patrol officers in Orangeburg, South Carolina, fired into a crowd of protesters demonstrating against segregation at a bowling alley near the campus of South Carolina State College, a historically black college. Three men were killed and twenty-eight persons were injured; most victims were shot in the back. ~ additional comment from Colleen Griffin re: comment…

Why America needs to reject the Charleston massacre’s dangerous narrative of forgiveness

The Orangeburg massacre is the most common name given to an incident on February 8, 1968, in which nine South Carolina Highway Patrol officers in Orangeburg, South Carolina, fired into a crowd of protesters demonstrating against segregation at a bowling alley near the campus of South Carolina State College, a historically black college. Three men were killed and twenty-eight persons were injured; most victims were shot in the back. ~ additional comment from Colleen Griffin re: comment…

On September 15, 1963 Johnny Robinson, age 16, was shot in the back by Birmingham police officer Jack Parker firing from a squad car. Others in the car said the driver going over a bump or hitting his brakes could have caused Parker to fire. Other witnesses heard two shots. Robinson's family never talked about his death, and his brother and sister went to school the next day. Another youth, Virgil Ware, 13, was also killed in the aftermath of the church bombing. #TodayInBlackHistory

Johnny's Death: The Untold Tragedy In Birmingham

Police use dogs to quell civil unrest in Birmingham, Ala., in May 1963. Birmingham's police commissioner "Bull" Connor also allowed fire hoses to be turned on young civil rights demonstrators. These measures set off a backlash of sentiment that rejuvenated the flagging civil rights movement.

Police use dogs to quell civil unrest in Birmingham, Ala., in May Birmingham's police commissioner "Bull" Connor also allowed fire hoses to be turned on young civil rights demonstrators.

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