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The 1940 census is the most recent census available for genealogical research. Claire Kluskens, archivist, discusses the information in this census and search strategies for accessing it.  “Beyond the Basics” Genealogy: 1940 Census  Saturday, June 15, at 10 a.m. Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance)  Image: Card Punch Operators Working on Agricultural Cards, Population and Housing Cards Carried 45 Columns, All Other Cards Carried 80 Columns, 1940 - 1941

The 1940 census is the most recent census available for genealogical research. Claire Kluskens, archivist, discusses the information in this census and search strategies for accessing it. “Beyond the Basics” Genealogy: 1940 Census Saturday, June 15, at 10 a.m. Room G-25, Research Center (Penn. Ave. Entrance) Image: Card Punch Operators Working on Agricultural Cards, Population and Housing Cards Carried 45 Columns, All Other Cards Carried 80 Columns, 1940 - 1941

Transferring data from the 1940 census questionnaire to punch cards for tabulation. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

Transferring data from the 1940 census questionnaire to punch cards for tabulation. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

In November 1937, the U.S. Census Bureau conducted an unemployment census to determine the impact of the depression and the Roosevelt Administration’s relief efforts on American workers. These census clerks began tabulating the returns from the census on November 24, 1937.Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

In November 1937, the U.S. Census Bureau conducted an unemployment census to determine the impact of the depression and the Roosevelt Administration’s relief efforts on American workers. These census clerks began tabulating the returns from the census on November 24, 1937.Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

#CensusHistory U.S. Census Bureau technicians above built mechanical sorters to organize the millions of punch cards that clerks produced following each census.  Although punch cards were used by the Census Bureau’s first computer - UNIVAC I - in the early 1950s, they were replaced by the Film Optical Sensing Device for Input to Computers (FOSDIC) introduced in 1954 and used to tabulate the 1960 Census.  FOSDIC read pencil-filled dots on microfilmed questionnaires and translated these marks…

#CensusHistory U.S. Census Bureau technicians above built mechanical sorters to organize the millions of punch cards that clerks produced following each census. Although punch cards were used by the Census Bureau’s first computer - UNIVAC I - in the early 1950s, they were replaced by the Film Optical Sensing Device for Input to Computers (FOSDIC) introduced in 1954 and used to tabulate the 1960 Census. FOSDIC read pencil-filled dots on microfilmed questionnaires and translated these marks…

Census Bureau employees from the Population Division working in a temporary building during the 1910s.

Census Bureau employees from the Population Division working in a temporary building during the 1910s.

#CensusHistory A U.S. Census Bureau clerk uses a pantograph (ca. 1908) to translate data on a census schedule to a punch card.  The punch cards were “read” by the electronic tabulators developed by Herman Hollerith for the 1890 Census. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

#CensusHistory A U.S. Census Bureau clerk uses a pantograph (ca. 1908) to translate data on a census schedule to a punch card. The punch cards were “read” by the electronic tabulators developed by Herman Hollerith for the 1890 Census. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

remembering where you came from helps you determine where you're going.

remembering where you came from helps you determine where you're going.

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