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In every storm, there is a rainbow visible somewhere because there is always light nearby. In the storms of life, there is always something beautiful because God is nearby. We just need to take the time to look for our rainbow.

In every storm, there is a rainbow visible somewhere because there is always light nearby. In the storms of life, there is always something beautiful because God is nearby. We just need to take the time to look for our rainbow.

A full fogbow, appearing like an alabaster rainbow over the wild ocean.

A full fogbow, appearing like an alabaster rainbow over the wild ocean.

Setenta Rayos, fuego en el cielo  Para realizar esta fotografía el Chris Kotsiopoulos disparó su cámara 90 veces durante 83 minutos.   Descartó 20 exposiciones para evitar la saturación lumínica de la foto.   Una imagen que da una idea de la enorme cantidad de energía eléctrica que descarga una tormenta.   La fotografía ha sido tomada en la isla de Ikaria (Grecia).

Setenta Rayos, fuego en el cielo Para realizar esta fotografía el Chris Kotsiopoulos disparó su cámara 90 veces durante 83 minutos. Descartó 20 exposiciones para evitar la saturación lumínica de la foto. Una imagen que da una idea de la enorme cantidad de energía eléctrica que descarga una tormenta. La fotografía ha sido tomada en la isla de Ikaria (Grecia).

In this incredible long exposure capture by fine art photographer Amery Carlson, we see a dramatic lightning storm off the coast of Ventura, California (officially the City of San Buenaventura). In the comments Avery says he can’t recall exactly how long the exposure was but his other settings were f/16/, ISO 200 and most importantly, a fantastic vantage point.

In this incredible long exposure capture by fine art photographer Amery Carlson, we see a dramatic lightning storm off the coast of Ventura, California (officially the City of San Buenaventura). In the comments Avery says he can’t recall exactly how long the exposure was but his other settings were f/16/, ISO 200 and most importantly, a fantastic vantage point.