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The origins of the Royal Society lie in an 'invisible college' of natural philosophers who began meeting in the mid-1640s to discuss the new philosophy of promoting knowledge of the natural world through observation and experiment, which we now call science.  Its official foundation date is 28 November 1660, when a group of 12 met at Gresham College after a lecture by Christopher Wren, then the Gresham Professor of Astronomy.

The origins of the Royal Society lie in an 'invisible college' of natural philosophers who began meeting in the mid-1640s to discuss the new philosophy of promoting knowledge of the natural world through observation and experiment, which we now call science. Its official foundation date is 28 November 1660, when a group of 12 met at Gresham College after a lecture by Christopher Wren, then the Gresham Professor of Astronomy.

Combining two of my loves--Geology and Art: Lithograph from Royal Society Report on Krakatoa Eruption, 1888.

Combining two of my loves--Geology and Art: Lithograph from Royal Society Report on Krakatoa Eruption, 1888.

This DNA computer 'grows as it computes' Read more Technology News Here --> http://digitaltechnologynews.com For several decades now researchers have been working on building computers out of DNA that can perform simple tasks. Some approaches are analogue as opposed to digital. Others use shampoo.   The idea of using DNA was first proposed in 1994 to address key limitations of silicon. The tiny size and supreme stability of the molecule give it a number of advantages over traditional…

This DNA computer 'grows as it computes' Read more Technology News Here --> http://digitaltechnologynews.com For several decades now researchers have been working on building computers out of DNA that can perform simple tasks. Some approaches are analogue as opposed to digital. Others use shampoo. The idea of using DNA was first proposed in 1994 to address key limitations of silicon. The tiny size and supreme stability of the molecule give it a number of advantages over traditional…

Snowflake research. 18th-century journal page showing snowflake configurations described in 1755 by John Nettis a physician from Middelburg, the Netherlands. Nettis used early forms of microscope lenses to make his observations. This page is from volume 49 (1755-6) of the journal 'Philosophical Transactions', published by the Royal Society of London.

Snowflake research. 18th-century journal page showing snowflake configurations described in 1755 by John Nettis a physician from Middelburg, the Netherlands. Nettis used early forms of microscope lenses to make his observations. This page is from volume 49 (1755-6) of the journal 'Philosophical Transactions', published by the Royal Society of London.

Illustration from De Humani Corporis Fabrica by Andreas Vesalius, first published in 1543

Picture library captures Royal Society's rich history

1920s nautical embroidery motifs. I don't do embroidery, but I could probably use these for something else at some point

1920s nautical embroidery motifs. I don't do embroidery, but I could probably use these for something else at some point

When Scientists Were Artists: The Royal Society's Picture Library Goes Digital    A hammerhead shark's baleful stare. A longnose batfish's fierce armor and delicate fins. These masterpieces of expression and scientific detail fill the pages of the world's first ichthyology book, De Historia Piscium, published in 1686 by the Royal Society.

When Scientists Were Artists: The Royal Society's Picture Library Goes Digital A hammerhead shark's baleful stare. A longnose batfish's fierce armor and delicate fins. These masterpieces of expression and scientific detail fill the pages of the world's first ichthyology book, De Historia Piscium, published in 1686 by the Royal Society.

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