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The Ancient Aqueduct

The Ancient Aqueduct

It’s nicknamed the Eternal City for a reason. In Rome, you can drink from a street fountain fed by an ancient aqueduct. Or see the same profile on a statue in the Capitoline Museum and the guy making your cappuccino. (Which, of course, you know never to order after 11 am.) Rome is also a city of contrasts—what other place on earth could be home to both the Vatican and La Dolce Vita?

It’s nicknamed the Eternal City for a reason. In Rome, you can drink from a street fountain fed by an ancient aqueduct. Or see the same profile on a statue in the Capitoline Museum and the guy making your cappuccino. (Which, of course, you know never to order after 11 am.) Rome is also a city of contrasts—what other place on earth could be home to both the Vatican and La Dolce Vita?

Meghalaya, India: A normal wooden bridge would quickly rot in Meghalaya’s subtropical climate — but these bridges consist of ancient tree roots and vines, and they’re very much strong and alive.

Meghalaya, India: A normal wooden bridge would quickly rot in Meghalaya’s subtropical climate — but these bridges consist of ancient tree roots and vines, and they’re very much strong and alive.

Baiae, was a Roman seaside resort on the Bay of Naples. It was for several hundred years a fashionable resort, especially towards the end of the Roman Republic. Baiae was an integral part of Portus Julius, home port of the western Imperial Fleet of ancient Rome.  Baiae was sacked by Muslim raiders in the 8th century AD and was deserted because of malaria by 1500. Because of coastal subsidence most of it is now under water in the Bay of Naples.

Baiae, was a Roman seaside resort on the Bay of Naples. It was for several hundred years a fashionable resort, especially towards the end of the Roman Republic. Baiae was an integral part of Portus Julius, home port of the western Imperial Fleet of ancient Rome. Baiae was sacked by Muslim raiders in the 8th century AD and was deserted because of malaria by 1500. Because of coastal subsidence most of it is now under water in the Bay of Naples.

SPECUS  [noun]  1.  cave, cavern, grotto, den; a hollow in the earth, especially one opening more or less horizontally into a hill, mountain, etc.  2. the roofed channel in which the water of an ancient Roman aqueduct flows whether underground or raised on embankments or arches; channel; drain.  Etymology: Latin specus, “cave, cavity, drain, channel; probably akin to Latin specere, “to look”.

SPECUS [noun] 1. cave, cavern, grotto, den; a hollow in the earth, especially one opening more or less horizontally into a hill, mountain, etc. 2. the roofed channel in which the water of an ancient Roman aqueduct flows whether underground or raised on embankments or arches; channel; drain. Etymology: Latin specus, “cave, cavity, drain, channel; probably akin to Latin specere, “to look”.

Bridge in Ronda, Spain - not seen much of the interior of Spain and this is definitely on my "list"...

Bridge in Ronda, Spain - not seen much of the interior of Spain and this is definitely on my "list"...

Albano Laziale (Roma) - Emissario del lago - Photo M. Pesci (01-2011) - © All rights reserved - Tesori del Lazio

Albano Laziale (Roma) - Emissario del lago - Photo M. Pesci (01-2011) - © All rights reserved - Tesori del Lazio

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