Terracotta lekythos (oil flask) Attributed to the Sappho Painter Period: Archaic Date: ca. 500 B.C. Culture: Greek, Attic Medium: Terracotta; black-figure, white-ground  Dimensions: H. 6 13/16 in. (17.3 cm); diameter 2 13/16 in. (7.2 cm) | Helios (the Sun) rises in his quadriga (4-horse chariot); above, Nyx (Night) driving away to the left and Eos (the goddess of dawn) to the right; Herakles offering sacrifice at altar. | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Terracotta lekythos (oil flask) Attributed to the Sappho Painter Period: Archaic Date: ca. 500 B.C. Culture: Greek, Attic Medium: Terracotta; black-figure, white-ground Dimensions: H. 6 13/16 in. (17.3 cm); diameter 2 13/16 in. (7.2 cm) | Helios (the Sun) rises in his quadriga (4-horse chariot); above, Nyx (Night) driving away to the left and Eos (the goddess of dawn) to the right; Herakles offering sacrifice at altar. | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Terracotta miniature volute-krater (mixing bowl)    Period:      Late Classical  Date:      ca. 325–300 B.C.  Culture:      Greek, South Italian, Apulian, Gnathian  Medium:      Terracotta  Dimensions:      H. 5 7/8 in. (14.9 cm)  Classification:      Vases

Terracotta miniature volute-krater (mixing bowl) Period: Late Classical Date: ca. 325–300 B.C. Culture: Greek, South Italian, Apulian, Gnathian Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: H. 5 7/8 in. (14.9 cm) Classification: Vases

Terracotta Pyxis Classical Greek 465-460 BC Attributed to the Penthesilea Painter  The Judgement of Paris During the middle of the fifth century B.C., the white-ground technique was commonly used for lekythoi, oil flasks placed on graves, and for fine vases of other shapes. As classical painters sought to achieve ever more complex effects with the limited possibilities of red-figure, the white background gave new prominence to the glaze lines and polychromy.

Terracotta Pyxis Classical Greek 465-460 BC Attributed to the Penthesilea Painter The Judgement of Paris During the middle of the fifth century B.C., the white-ground technique was commonly used for lekythoi, oil flasks placed on graves, and for fine vases of other shapes. As classical painters sought to achieve ever more complex effects with the limited possibilities of red-figure, the white background gave new prominence to the glaze lines and polychromy.

Terracotta kantharos (drinking cup with high vertical handles) Period: Archaic Date: mid-6th century B.C. Culture: East Greek or Cypriot Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: H. 5 3/4 in. (14.6 cm) Classification: Vases Credit Line: The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76 Accession Number: 74.51.369

Terracotta kantharos (drinking cup with high vertical handles) Period: Archaic Date: mid-6th century B.C. Culture: East Greek or Cypriot Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: H. 5 3/4 in. (14.6 cm) Classification: Vases Credit Line: The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76 Accession Number: 74.51.369

Attributed to the Leagros Group. Terracotta Panathenaic prize amphora (jar), ca. 510 B.C.  The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1907 (07.286.80).

Attributed to the Leagros Group. Terracotta Panathenaic prize amphora (jar), ca. 510 B.C. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1907 (07.286.80).

ancientpeoples: “Terracotta Askos in the Form of a Duck Greek, Attic 4th century B.C. Source:  Metropolitan Museum of Art ”

ancientpeoples: “Terracotta Askos in the Form of a Duck Greek, Attic 4th century B.C. Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art ”

Terracotta Vase in the Form of a Lobster Claw  ca. 460 BC  Greek, Classical  Because so many aspects of Greek life depended on the sea, a vase in the shape of a lobster claw is not surprising. It is, however, exceptional and may be a variant of the askos—a bag-shaped oil container provided with a vertical mouth and strap handle. The Dionysiac iconography of the lobster claw suggests that it was a novelty item used at symposia (drinking parties).

Terracotta Vase in the Form of a Lobster Claw ca. 460 BC Greek, Classical Because so many aspects of Greek life depended on the sea, a vase in the shape of a lobster claw is not surprising. It is, however, exceptional and may be a variant of the askos—a bag-shaped oil container provided with a vertical mouth and strap handle. The Dionysiac iconography of the lobster claw suggests that it was a novelty item used at symposia (drinking parties).

Pintor de Dutuit, Nice alada transportando un thymiaterion, 490 a.n.e. Metropolitan Museum of Arts, Nueva York

Pintor de Dutuit, Nice alada transportando un thymiaterion, 490 a.n.e. Metropolitan Museum of Arts, Nueva York

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