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Native American Finger Weaving Tutorial- to share for third grade Native American Studies unit

Native American Finger Weaving Tutorial- to share for third grade Native American Studies unit

By the 1800s, a mixture of Cree, Scots, Quebecois, Athabascan peoples in Canada had developed a culture known as Métis. These sashes have become an iconic symbol for that/ those culture(s), and even for Canada as a nation. The earliest and most intricate versions were braided ('finger-woven'), but later on loom-woven versions were made for commerce/ trade. Ceinture fléchée, free-end braiding, finger weaving, Métis sash

By the 1800s, a mixture of Cree, Scots, Quebecois, Athabascan peoples in Canada had developed a culture known as Métis. These sashes have become an iconic symbol for that/ those culture(s), and even for Canada as a nation. The earliest and most intricate versions were braided ('finger-woven'), but later on loom-woven versions were made for commerce/ trade. Ceinture fléchée, free-end braiding, finger weaving, Métis sash

Cherokee finger weaver Danielle Culp prefers finger weaving over all of her other interests because there’s not many Cherokee finger weavers.

Cherokee finger weaver Danielle Culp prefers finger weaving over all of her other interests because there’s not many Cherokee finger weavers.

The first time I heard of ceinture fléchée was in the Guild of Canadian Weavers  test program about 1998. In one test question it was one of...

The first time I heard of ceinture fléchée was in the Guild of Canadian Weavers test program about 1998. In one test question it was one of...

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