Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas

Today’s character comes from another very very famous kaidan ghost story called Bancho Sarayashiki, or “The Dish Mansion at Bancho.” Her name is Okiku, and she is one of the most famous ghosts in Japanese folklore. Her story has been adapted into puppet theater, kabuki, movies, ukiyo-e and every other imaginable art form. Her story takes place in the area of Bancho, in present-day Hyogo prefecture, but it has been adapted to other locations, and tweaked, and changed, so there are a number…

A-Yokai-A-Day: Tatarigami Posted on Wednesday October 28th, 2015 I came across this on the internet recently: an article from the Daily Mail in 1933 comparing Japanese ghosts with British ones. It’s done with the usual sense of British Empire superiority, and quickly finds a way to dismiss Japanese ghosts as inferior (no feet, haunt “flimsy wood and paper” houses), but it does at least concede that Japan does have scary ghosts! I think today, most people around the world would agree that no…

Sara-hebi (さら蛇) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman. Yokai Ghost stories from Japanese folklore.

Тамамо-но Маэ. Иллюстрация Мэтью Мэйера Тамамо-но Маэ — лиса-оборотень, персонаж одной из самых древних сохранившихся историй про кицунэ в японской мифологииfo

Shiryō (死霊, しりょう) Shiryō means “dead ghost” and stands in contrast to the ikiryō, or living ghost. Shiryō can be considered synonymous with yūrei (“faint spirit”), as they are both words for the classic Japanese ghost. However while yūrei can be creepy some times and beautifully mysterious at other times, shiryō is only used to refer to scary, nasty ghosts. The inclusion of the kanji for “death” in the name is the clue that this ghost is not to be romanticised. Shiryō can act in similar…

Yama Uba by GENZOMAN Yama-uba (山姥?, mountain crone) is a yōkai ("spirit" or "monster") found in Japanese folklore. The name may also be spelled Yamamba or Yamanba. She is sometimes confused with the Yuki-onna ("snow woman"), but the two figures are not the same. Yama-uba looks like an old woman, usually a hideous one and her kimono is filthy and tattered. Her mouth is sometimes said to stretch the entire width of her face, and some depictions give her a second mouth at the top of her head.

A long time ago in the area of Tokyo known as Yotsuya there was a masterless ronin samurai named Iyemon. He wished to marry a beautiful woman named Oiwa, but her father, Samon, had heard of Iyemon’s past misdeeds and refused to allow him to marry his daughter. Iyemon’s servant Naosuke also wished to marry Oiwa’s sister Osode, who was unfortunately already married to a man named Yomoshichi. So Iyemon and Naosuke conspired to murder Oiwa’s father and his servants, and Osode’s husband. In order…