Explore Wrasse Asperatus, Mammatus Clouds and more!

Explore related topics

Undulatus asperatus

Undulatus Asperatus cloud formations appear dark and storm-like. If fact, they tend to dissipate without storm forming. These cloud formations have been particularly common in states situated in the Plains of the United States.

These wave-like cloud formations, formally know as "undulatus asperatus," may soon be included in the International Cloud Atlas.

These wave-like cloud formations, formally know as "undulatus asperatus," may soon be included in the International Cloud Atlas.

An Introspective World: Asperatus Clouds

"undulatus asperatus" cloud formation over Schiehallion, Perthshire, Scotland. By Ken Prior.

The mysterious, wild and wave-like 'Undulatus Asperatus' clouds - Strange Sounds

Cool Newly Classified Cloud Formation: Undulatus Asperatus, a cloud formation, proposed in 2009 as a separate cloud classification by the founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society.

18 Insane and Unusual Weather Phenomena's That Are Actually Real - BlazePress

18 Insane and Unusual Weather Phenomena's That Are Actually Real

squipy: “ Undulatus Asperatus Ominous Clouds Over Ohio A cloud formation, proposed in 2009 as a separate cloud classification by the founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society.

Undulatus Asperatus Cloud  This surreal looking cloud is a new discovery, the first since 1951! This has been put forward for official classification by the founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society, Gavin Pretor-Pinney. It looks scary, but these clouds generally follow after a storm rather than become one. The wave affect comes from turbulent differing air masses pushing cloud into shapes like rough waves on the sea. I have been lucky enough to see one of these,

Undulatus asperatus (or alternately, asperatus) is a cloud formation, proposed in 2009 as a separate cloud classification by the founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society. If successful it will be the first cloud formation added since cirrus intor.

A stunning time-lapse video captured by Alex Schueth shows an undulatus asperatus cloud formation rolling like waves over Lincoln, Nebraska. Undulatus asperatus is not yet officially recognized as ...

Stunning Time-Lapse Footage Shows Undulatus Asperatus Clouds Rolling Like Waves Over Lincoln, Nebraska

In this remarkable timelapse by Alex Schueth, we see Undulatus asperatus clouds rolling through Lincoln, Nebraska on July The clouds look like rolling ocean waves in the sky and the…

Undulus Asperatus  The ominous-looking clouds have been particularly common in the Plains states of the United States, often during the morning or midday hours following convective thunderstorm activity. These clouds are not considered a precursor to severe weather, rather appear to form following rain or thunderstorm activity.  Jane Wiggins of Cedar Rapids, Iowa recently captured several spectacular images of the new cloud type as viewed from a downtown office building.

This turbulently undulating cloud photographed over Cedar Rapids Iowa may soon be designated as the first new cloud type named in over 50 years: Undulus Asperatus.

Pinterest
Search