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Cauliflower  is a demanding cool-season edible, thriving only in temperatures below 70 degrees F. As heads start to form, they must be blanched—protected from the sun—to remain white and mildly-flavored. Wrap outer leaves over heads and hold in place with clothespins, rubber bands or garden twine. Also be on the lookout for varieties that yield green or orange heads.

Cauliflower is a demanding cool-season edible, thriving only in temperatures below 70 degrees F. As heads start to form, they must be blanched—protected from the sun—to remain white and mildly-flavored. Wrap outer leaves over heads and hold in place with clothespins, rubber bands or garden twine. Also be on the lookout for varieties that yield green or orange heads.

Cabbage  is very cold hardy. Stagger the planting so you can enjoy cabbage all winter.

Cabbage is very cold hardy. Stagger the planting so you can enjoy cabbage all winter.

Cauliflower  is a demanding cool-season edible, thriving only in temperatures below 70 degrees F. As heads start to form, they must be blanched—protected from the sun—to remain white and mildly-flavored. Wrap outer leaves over heads and hold in place with clothespins, rubber bands or garden twine. Also be on the lookout for varieties that yield green or orange heads.

Cauliflower is a demanding cool-season edible, thriving only in temperatures below 70 degrees F. As heads start to form, they must be blanched—protected from the sun—to remain white and mildly-flavored. Wrap outer leaves over heads and hold in place with clothespins, rubber bands or garden twine. Also be on the lookout for varieties that yield green or orange heads.

Mustard greens offer a quick crop that yields nutrient-rich leaves perfect for cooking Southern-style or adding to salads for a tangy zing. The secret to tasty mustard greens is evenly moist soil. When plants experience drought stress, the mustard flavor intensifies, bringing on the heat. Frost sweetens leaves. If you garden where killing frosts don’t occur, plan on harvesting mustard greens all winter long.

Mustard greens offer a quick crop that yields nutrient-rich leaves perfect for cooking Southern-style or adding to salads for a tangy zing. The secret to tasty mustard greens is evenly moist soil. When plants experience drought stress, the mustard flavor intensifies, bringing on the heat. Frost sweetens leaves. If you garden where killing frosts don’t occur, plan on harvesting mustard greens all winter long.

Homegrown  peas  serve delectable sweetness you won’t find in the grocery store. Why? Peas start converting sugar to starch a few hours after they have been picked. Eating peas fresh from the garden gives you a taste treat that’s tough to beat. Plant seeds well before last chance of spring frost. Choose edible pod peas, like snow peas or snap peas, or grow garden or English peas (nonedible shells).

Homegrown peas serve delectable sweetness you won’t find in the grocery store. Why? Peas start converting sugar to starch a few hours after they have been picked. Eating peas fresh from the garden gives you a taste treat that’s tough to beat. Plant seeds well before last chance of spring frost. Choose edible pod peas, like snow peas or snap peas, or grow garden or English peas (nonedible shells).

Vegetables Garden,Too Late,Fig

Spinach  is great to grow in cool weather. Add it salads or saute with garlic for a hearty winter feast.

Spinach is great to grow in cool weather. Add it salads or saute with garlic for a hearty winter feast.

Homegrown  peas  serve delectable sweetness you won’t find in the grocery store. Why? Peas start converting sugar to starch a few hours after they have been picked. Eating peas fresh from the garden gives you a taste treat that’s tough to beat. Plant seeds well before last chance of spring frost. Choose edible pod peas, like snow peas or snap peas, or grow garden or English peas (nonedible shells).

Homegrown peas serve delectable sweetness you won’t find in the grocery store. Why? Peas start converting sugar to starch a few hours after they have been picked. Eating peas fresh from the garden gives you a taste treat that’s tough to beat. Plant seeds well before last chance of spring frost. Choose edible pod peas, like snow peas or snap peas, or grow garden or English peas (nonedible shells).

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