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Searching for Jim is the untold story of Sam Clemens and the world of slavery that produced him. Despite Clemens’s remarks to the contrary in his autobiography, slavery was very much a part of his life. Terrell Dempsey has uncovered a wealth of newspaper accounts and archival material revealing that Clemens’s life, from the ages of twelve to seventeen, was intertwined with the lives of the slaves around him.

Searching for Jim is the untold story of Sam Clemens and the world of slavery that produced him. Despite Clemens’s remarks to the contrary in his autobiography, slavery was very much a part of his life. Terrell Dempsey has uncovered a wealth of newspaper accounts and archival material revealing that Clemens’s life, from the ages of twelve to seventeen, was intertwined with the lives of the slaves around him.

Last King of the Sports Page: The Life and Career of Jim Murray (SPORTS & AMERICAN CULTURE) by Ted Geltner, http://www.amazon.com/dp/0826219799/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_heWgqb03DWANW

Last King of the Sports Page: The Life and Career of Jim Murray (SPORTS & AMERICAN CULTURE) by Ted Geltner, http://www.amazon.com/dp/0826219799/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_heWgqb03DWANW

this is so true...even without moving on to another individual, she moves on because experiencing the disinterest tells her it wouldn't have lasted anyway.

this is so true...even without moving on to another individual, she moves on because experiencing the disinterest tells her it wouldn't have lasted anyway.

Mark Twain claimed he could read human character as well as he could read the Mississippi River. Now one of America’s preeminent Twain scholars has interwoven the author’s inner life with his writings to produce a meditation on how Twain’s understanding of human nature evolved and deepened. Quirk charts the ways in which this humorist and occasional philosopher contemplated human nature, revealing how his outlook changed over the years.

Mark Twain claimed he could read human character as well as he could read the Mississippi River. Now one of America’s preeminent Twain scholars has interwoven the author’s inner life with his writings to produce a meditation on how Twain’s understanding of human nature evolved and deepened. Quirk charts the ways in which this humorist and occasional philosopher contemplated human nature, revealing how his outlook changed over the years.

Mark Twain’s works, including his popular novels about Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, are rich in medical imagery and medical themes derived from his personal experiences, but his interactions with the medical profession and his comments about health, illness, and physicians have largely been overlooked. In Mark Twain and Medicine, K. Patrick Ober remedies this omission.

Mark Twain’s works, including his popular novels about Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, are rich in medical imagery and medical themes derived from his personal experiences, but his interactions with the medical profession and his comments about health, illness, and physicians have largely been overlooked. In Mark Twain and Medicine, K. Patrick Ober remedies this omission.

The Jester and the Sages approaches the life and work of Mark Twain by placing him in conversation with three eminent philosophers of his time—Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, and Karl Marx.

The Jester and the Sages approaches the life and work of Mark Twain by placing him in conversation with three eminent philosophers of his time—Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, and Karl Marx.

Metaphor theory, observes John Bird, is like Mark Twain: both seem simple upon first introduction. Now, in the most complete study to date of Twain’s use of figurative language, a veteran Twain scholar tackles the core of his writing and explores it with theoretical approaches that have rarely been applied to Twain, providing new insights into how he imagined his world—and the singular ways in which he expressed himself.

Metaphor theory, observes John Bird, is like Mark Twain: both seem simple upon first introduction. Now, in the most complete study to date of Twain’s use of figurative language, a veteran Twain scholar tackles the core of his writing and explores it with theoretical approaches that have rarely been applied to Twain, providing new insights into how he imagined his world—and the singular ways in which he expressed himself.

In the first book in more than fifty years to examine the initial phase of Samuel Clemens’s writing career, James Caron draws on contemporary scholarship and his own careful readings to offer a fresh and comprehensive perspective on those early years—and to challenge many long-standing views of Mark Twain’s place in the tradition of American humor.

In the first book in more than fifty years to examine the initial phase of Samuel Clemens’s writing career, James Caron draws on contemporary scholarship and his own careful readings to offer a fresh and comprehensive perspective on those early years—and to challenge many long-standing views of Mark Twain’s place in the tradition of American humor.

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