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Anti Shinzo Abe

Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force patrol missile boats launch anti-missile IR decoys during a fleet review at Sagami Bay, off Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, on Sunday, Oct. 18, 2015. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's public approval ratings declined after the passage of legislation allowing Japan to send troops to fight in overseas conflicts for the first time since World War II. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force patrol missile boats launch anti-missile IR decoys during a fleet review at Sagami Bay, off Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, on Sunday, Oct. 18, 2015. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's public approval ratings declined after the passage of legislation allowing Japan to send troops to fight in overseas conflicts for the first time since World War II. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force destroyer ship Kurama sails through the smoke of anti-IR missile flares during a review at Sagami Bay, off Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, on Sunday, Oct. 18, 2015. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's public approval ratings declined after the passage of legislation allowing Japan to send troops to fight in overseas conflicts for the first time since World War II. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force destroyer ship Kurama sails through the smoke of anti-IR missile flares during a review at Sagami Bay, off Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, on Sunday, Oct. 18, 2015. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's public approval ratings declined after the passage of legislation allowing Japan to send troops to fight in overseas conflicts for the first time since World War II. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Anti-nuclear activists protest against Shinzo Abe's India visit | www.dnaindia.com

Anti-nuclear activists protest against Shinzo Abe's India visit | www.dnaindia.com

Protesters holding placards shout slogans at a rally against Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's push to expand Japan's military role in front of Abe's official residence in Tokyo, June 30, 2014.

Protesters holding placards shout slogans at a rally against Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's push to expand Japan's military role in front of Abe's official residence in Tokyo, June 30, 2014.

Diet surrounded in human-chain protest, Anti-war rally takes Abe to task on Constitution: Outside the Diet building Tuesday, activists form a human chain in solidarity against Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's shortcut plan to reinterpret the Constitution to allow Japan to legally exercise the right to collective self-defense. Combating what they call an effort to turn Japan into “a pro-war country,” 2,500 people formed a human chain around the Diet building.

Diet surrounded in human-chain protest, Anti-war rally takes Abe to task on Constitution: Outside the Diet building Tuesday, activists form a human chain in solidarity against Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's shortcut plan to reinterpret the Constitution to allow Japan to legally exercise the right to collective self-defense. Combating what they call an effort to turn Japan into “a pro-war country,” 2,500 people formed a human chain around the Diet building.

People hold placards denouncing Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's security-related legislation during an anti-government rally in Tokyo July 24, 2015. Abe, pushed through parliament's lower house legislation that could see troops sent to fight abroad for the first time since World War Two, despite protests and a risk of further damage to his sagging ratings. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

People hold placards denouncing Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's security-related legislation during an anti-government rally in Tokyo July 24, 2015. Abe, pushed through parliament's lower house legislation that could see troops sent to fight abroad for the first time since World War Two, despite protests and a risk of further damage to his sagging ratings. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Could Japan Become America’s New Proxy Army? | "Japan has been shaken by the largest anti-war demos since the late 60s, when millions of students, workers & ordinary citizens turned out to try to block their govt’s collaboration w/the US war in Vietnam. The issue this time is the plan by PM Shinzo Abe to alter a key provision of Japan’s peace constitution to allow Japan’s “Self Defense Forces” to take part in overseas military ops f/the 1st time since WWII." Read/share full article. 7/27

Could Japan Become America’s New Proxy Army? | "Japan has been shaken by the largest anti-war demos since the late 60s, when millions of students, workers & ordinary citizens turned out to try to block their govt’s collaboration w/the US war in Vietnam. The issue this time is the plan by PM Shinzo Abe to alter a key provision of Japan’s peace constitution to allow Japan’s “Self Defense Forces” to take part in overseas military ops f/the 1st time since WWII." Read/share full article. 7/27

LDP may lose next election if nuclear exit becomes main issue: Koizumi - Former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi said the pro-nuclear ruling party of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe could lose the next lower house election if whether to give up nuclear power becomes the main election issue. “(Anti-nuclear) opinions are beginning to grow…that could influence the (next) House of Representatives election.”

LDP may lose next election if nuclear exit becomes main issue: Koizumi - Former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi said the pro-nuclear ruling party of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe could lose the next lower house election if whether to give up nuclear power becomes the main election issue. “(Anti-nuclear) opinions are beginning to grow…that could influence the (next) House of Representatives election.”

bloomberg view illustration - shinzo abe by deforgeo, via Flickr

bloomberg view illustration - shinzo abe by deforgeo, via Flickr

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