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Australopithecus Afarensis ~ I have often wondered why primates were the only species to evolve a huge brain and rise above all animals to rule the world as humans. Why wasn't it a cephalopod or a marine mammal, like a dolphin... both are very intelligent creatures?

Australopithecus Afarensis ~ I have often wondered why primates were the only species to evolve a huge brain and rise above all animals to rule the world as humans. Why wasn't it a cephalopod or a marine mammal, like a dolphin... both are very intelligent creatures?

Australopithecus anamensis (or Praeanthropus anamensis) is a stem-human species that lived approximately four million years ago. Nearly one hundred fossil specimens are known from Kenya and Ethiopia, representing over 20 individuals.

Australopithecus anamensis (or Praeanthropus anamensis) is a stem-human species that lived approximately four million years ago. Nearly one hundred fossil specimens are known from Kenya and Ethiopia, representing over 20 individuals.

Hominid, Paranthropus boisei, who lived in Eastern Africa during the Pleistocene epoch from about 2.3 to 1.2 million years ago...

Hominid, Paranthropus boisei, who lived in Eastern Africa during the Pleistocene epoch from about 2.3 to 1.2 million years ago...

Homo floresiensis ("Flores Man", nicknamed "hobbit" and "Flo") is a possible species, now extinct, in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual were discovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Partial skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium (skull).[1][2] These remains have been the subject of intense research to determine whether they represent a species distinct from modern humans, and the progres

Homo floresiensis ("Flores Man", nicknamed "hobbit" and "Flo") is a possible species, now extinct, in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual were discovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Partial skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium (skull).[1][2] These remains have been the subject of intense research to determine whether they represent a species distinct from modern humans, and the progres

El primer hallazgo de un fósil de esta especie lo debemos a Louis Leakey, quien en 1959 reportó el hallazgo de una nueva especie "Zinjanthropus", en la garganta de Olduvai, en Tanzania. Este especímen fue datado en 1,8 millones de años. Hallazgos subsecuentes de esta especie se produjeron en el norte de Tanzania, en el norte de Kenya y en el sur de Etiopía.

El primer hallazgo de un fósil de esta especie lo debemos a Louis Leakey, quien en 1959 reportó el hallazgo de una nueva especie "Zinjanthropus", en la garganta de Olduvai, en Tanzania. Este especímen fue datado en 1,8 millones de años. Hallazgos subsecuentes de esta especie se produjeron en el norte de Tanzania, en el norte de Kenya y en el sur de Etiopía.

ANCESTOR  A 1.34-million-year-old partial skeleton of the Plio-Pleistocene hominin Paranthropus boisei found at the Olduvai Gorge site in Tanzania represents one of the most recent occurrences of the hominin before its extinction in East Africa. Image credit: Cicero Moraes / CC BY-SA 3.0.

ANCESTOR A 1.34-million-year-old partial skeleton of the Plio-Pleistocene hominin Paranthropus boisei found at the Olduvai Gorge site in Tanzania represents one of the most recent occurrences of the hominin before its extinction in East Africa. Image credit: Cicero Moraes / CC BY-SA 3.0.

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