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from the Guardian

Revealed: first mammal species wiped out by human-induced climate change

Human-caused climate change appears to have driven the Great Barrier Reef’s only endemic mammal species into the history books, with the Bramble Cay melomys, a small rodent that lives on a tiny island in the eastern Torres Strait, being completely wiped-out from its only known location.

More than 120 birds including 30 endemic species are shown in their natural environment. The documentary also includes animals of special interest: sea turtles, lizards, and snakes plus two of the most endangered land mammals of the world (Solenodon and Hutia) in its habitat.

from the Guardian

Kipepeo butterfly project - in pictures

Pearl charaxes (Charaxes varanes). Arabuko-Sokoke is a 420km sq forest that contains 20% of Kenya’s bird species, 30% of its butterfly species and at least 24 rare of endemic bird, mammal and butterfly species

Short-Eared Dog (Atelocynus microtis), also known as the short-eared fox, short-eared zorro or small-eared dog, is a unique and elusive canid species endemic to the Amazonian basin. This is the only species assigned to the genus Atelocynus

from the Guardian

Revealed: first mammal species wiped out by human-induced climate change

The Bramble Cay melomys has become extinct, Australian scientists say. The first extinction directly attributed to man-made climate change.

The Bramble Cay melomys or mosaic-tailed rat. Endemic to the Great Barrier Reef this is the first mammal to go extinct due to human-induced climate change [900 x 450] - http://ift.tt/1U7Udlu

from the Guardian

Revealed: first mammal species wiped out by human-induced climate change

Revealed: first mammal species wiped out by human-induced climate change | Environment | The Guardian

Baby Tenrecs (Lesser Hedgehog Tenrec) - endemic to Madagascar, looks like a hedgehog but it's actually a very different animal. The tenrec family comprises animals that look like hedgehogs, opossums and even otters, but are actually a great example of convergent evolution (the process whereby organisms not closely related independently evolve similar traits as a result of having to adapt to similar environments or ecological niches).