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The Colosseum

The Flavian amphitheatre in Rome, better known as the Colosseum, was built between May 24 70 CE and June 29 80 CE under the reign of Emperor Vespasian and later inaugurated by his son Titus. It was one...

from Ancient History Encyclopedia

Attic Black Figure Lekythos

Ure Museum, 38.4.8. Date: 550-525 BCE Shape: Lekythos Material: Attic Black Figure Terracotta

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The Sack of Rome by the Gauls, 390 BCE

After the Gauls defeated the Romans at the confluence of the Tiber and the Allia rivers, the Gauls marched on to Rome. In late July 390 BCE, the undefended city fell to the invaders to be burnt and sacked. Only on the Capitol Hill, did a small number of Romans put up a valiant defense, holding out until famine forced them to surrender. The Romans were forced to pay the Gauls a hefty ransom of gold to depart. (By Ludwig Heinrich Dyck) --AHE

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Vandals

'The Sack of Rome' by Karl Briullov (1799-1852). The Vandals were a Germanic tribe who were first mentioned in Roman history by Pliny the Elder (77 CE). They sacked Rome in 455 CE, causing the name 'vandal' to be synonymous with destruction and barbarians. - Joshua J. Mark on Ancient History Encyclopedia

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Fall of the Roman Empire

To many historians the fall of the Roman Empire has always been viewed as the end of the ancient world and the onset of the Middle Ages, often improperly called the Dark Ages, despite Petrarch’s assertion. Since much of the west had already fallen by the middle of the fifth century, when a writer speaks of the fall of the empire, he or she generally refers to the fall of the city of Rome. (Info by Donald L. Wasson) -- AHE

from Ancient History Encyclopedia

Roman Citizenship

Citizenship is and always has been a valued possession of any individual. When one studies the majority of ancient empires one finds that the concept of citizenship, in any form, was non-existent. The people in these societies did not and could not participate in the affairs of their government. These governments were either theocratic or under the control of a non-elected sovereign, answerable to no one except himself. (Article by Donald L. Wasson) --AHE

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Roman Siege Warfare

In ancient warfare open battles were the preferred mode of meeting the enemy, but sometimes, when defenders took a stand within their well-fortified city or military camp, siege warfare became a necessity, despite its high expense in money, time, and men. The Romans became adept at the art of siege warfare employing all manner of strategies and machinery to batter the enemy into submission. (By Mark Cartwright) --AHE

from Ancient History Encyclopedia

Roman Government

Western Civilization is forever indebted to the people of ancient Greece and Rome. Among the numerous contributions these societies made are in the fields of art, literature and philosophy; however, perhaps their greatest gift to future generations was the modern perception of government. The contemporary idea of democracy, while borne out of the political struggles in the city of Athens, came to fruition in the Roman Republic. (Info by Donald L. Wasson) -- AHE