Explore Weimar, Cabaret and more!

Sebastian Droste (1892-1927) was a poet, actor and dancer connected with the gay and underworld subcultures of Berlin in the 1920s. In 1922, Droste married expressionist exotic dancer and actress in German silent movies, Anita Berber.

Sebastian Droste (1892-1927) was a poet, actor and dancer connected with the gay and underworld subcultures of Berlin in the 1920s. In 1922, Droste married expressionist exotic dancer and actress in German silent movies, Anita Berber.

Nipple tassels, revelry and stonkingly good cocktails... what more could you want? A little slice of 20s burlesque in Berlin, Kreuzberg describes itself as a 'rabbit hole' – one leading to a far more adult Wonderland – and embodies the Weimar speakeasy aesthetic made so famous by Cabaret.

17 Incredible Underground Bars In Berlin

Nipple tassels, revelry and stonkingly good cocktails... what more could you want? A little slice of 20s burlesque in Berlin, Kreuzberg describes itself as a 'rabbit hole' – one leading to a far more adult Wonderland – and embodies the Weimar speakeasy aesthetic made so famous by Cabaret.

"Weimar Berlin was a city in chaos. The old rules no longer applied. New ideas about art, money, gender, and sexuality arose and were brought to life on the cabaret stage. Berliners sought out cabaret as a wild way to process their difficult, changing lives."

"Weimar Berlin was a city in chaos. The old rules no longer applied. New ideas about art, money, gender, and sexuality arose and were brought to life on the cabaret stage. Berliners sought out cabaret as a wild way to process their difficult, changing lives."

The first Punk? Weimar Republic-era Valeska Gert.

Dress-down Friday: Valeska Gert

The first Punk? Weimar Republic-era Valeska Gert.

“German actress Valerie Boothby (1906-1982) was a popular star of the Weimar cinema in the late 1920’s and early 1930’s. She entered the film business in 1925 during the heydays of the German silent cinema.”

“German actress Valerie Boothby (1906-1982) was a popular star of the Weimar cinema in the late 1920’s and early 1930’s. She entered the film business in 1925 during the heydays of the German silent cinema.”

Grit and Ina van Elben’s dancing-machine at the Tingel-Tangel Theatre, 1931 From Voluptuous Panic: The Erotic World of Weimar Berlin

Grit and Ina van Elben’s dancing-machine at the Tingel-Tangel Theatre, 1931 From Voluptuous Panic: The Erotic World of Weimar Berlin

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