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Brugmansia, Eternity

Brugmansia, Eternity

15 Ways Pinterest users can find your Content.  http://bloggersmakemoney.com/15-ways-pinterest-users-find-content/

15 Ways Pinterest users can find your Content. http://bloggersmakemoney.com/15-ways-pinterest-users-find-content/

Odontonema strictum, firespike,  Two back behind garage  Firespike is not only good-looking, but it also attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.  The plant spreads underground, but can also be propagated easily from softwood cuttings that flower in their first year.  O. strictum is also very amenable to pruning.  You can either cut it back hard or prune it lightly several times during the year to maintain the look that you prefer.

Odontonema strictum, firespike, Two back behind garage Firespike is not only good-looking, but it also attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. The plant spreads underground, but can also be propagated easily from softwood cuttings that flower in their first year. O. strictum is also very amenable to pruning. You can either cut it back hard or prune it lightly several times during the year to maintain the look that you prefer.

[Strawberry Spinach is one of the best-kept secrets of the herb world. A native American plant, this annual sets tiny, deliciously tender leaves that can be cooked like spinach or used fresh in salads. It also sets small red fruits in late summer and fall that taste a bit like mulberries and are lovely fresh or canned. Genus:	Chenopodium  Species:	capitatum  ]

[Strawberry Spinach is one of the best-kept secrets of the herb world. A native American plant, this annual sets tiny, deliciously tender leaves that can be cooked like spinach or used fresh in salads. It also sets small red fruits in late summer and fall that taste a bit like mulberries and are lovely fresh or canned. Genus: Chenopodium Species: capitatum ]

American Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis): Thomas Mann Randolph, Jefferson’s horticulturally astute son-in-law, observed the native or American columbine blooming at Monticello on April 30, 1791, and the species can still be found growing wild at Monticello.  The flowers of the Native Columbine attract butterflies and hummingbirds, and the seeds provide food for some birds, including finches and buntings.

American Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis): Thomas Mann Randolph, Jefferson’s horticulturally astute son-in-law, observed the native or American columbine blooming at Monticello on April 30, 1791, and the species can still be found growing wild at Monticello. The flowers of the Native Columbine attract butterflies and hummingbirds, and the seeds provide food for some birds, including finches and buntings.

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