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Ancient Stone House, County Down, Ireland. Wow. The stories and lives this place has witnessed . . . if stones could talk . . .

Street in Giverny, France: Giverny is a village in the Eure department in northern France. It is best known as the location of Claude Monet's (famous painter) garden and home. Narrow street from the image above is a true floral park and therefore it is very pleasant to walk.

Color Changing Tiles

"Northern Lights Tile". Tiles appear black at room temp, but move through the color spectrum when the temperature changes.

Oh man, I've gotta figure out a "country mouse" option to complement my "city mouse" day to day. Can't I just build this in one of the city parks?

Tour This 1890s California Farmhouse and Garden

Northern California Farmhouse and Garden - Guesthouse - 'Blushing Bride' hydrangeas and 'Morning Light' ornamental grasses soften the path to guesthouse with a wraparound porch.

HOUSE TOUR: An Abandoned Summer Camp Becomes An Eclectic Family Home

When a Manhattan couple stumbled upon a 19th-century summer camp in Northern California, they never dreamed they would succumb to its charms.​

Ireland's Dark Hedges Is The Most Mystifyingly Cool Road Ever

Dark Hedges, Ballymoney, Ireland. This beautiful avenue of beech trees was planted by the Stuart family in the eighteenth century. It was intended as a compelling landscape feature to impress visitors as they approached the entrance to their home, Gracehill House. They are reputedly haunted by a ‘Grey lady’. Two centuries later, the trees remain a magnificent sight as they form an arc over the road and have become known as the Dark Hedges.

THE BUNKIE | Omis Haus B&B About 30 minutes outside of Niagara Falls in St. Catherines, Ontario is a tiny cabin featuring a wisteria and fairy-lined backyard complete with hot tub and swimming pool.

The Dark Hedges, Ireland

This beautiful avenue of beech trees was planted by the Stuart family in the eighteenth century.  It was intended as a compelling landscape feature to impress visitors as they approached the entrance to their home, Gracehill House.  Two centuries later, the trees remain a magnificent sight and have become known as the Dark Hedges.