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Ushabti of Ken-Amun. Ken-Amun. Ken-Amun was overseer of the royal records during the 19th Dynasty of ancient Egypt. He was married to a woman named Isis who was a singer of the god Atum. His tomb, discovered by Zahi Hawass in 2010 was found in Tell el-Maskhuta, near Ismailia, 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of Cairo. It was the first ever Ramesside Period tomb uncovered in Lower Egypt. Walters Museum, 22194

Ushabti of Ken-Amun. Ken-Amun. Ken-Amun was overseer of the royal records during the 19th Dynasty of ancient Egypt. He was married to a woman named Isis who was a singer of the god Atum. His tomb, discovered by Zahi Hawass in 2010 was found in Tell el-Maskhuta, near Ismailia, 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of Cairo. It was the first ever Ramesside Period tomb uncovered in Lower Egypt. Walters Museum, 22194

Earring, found in the tomb of Horemheb, Saqqara, Egypt. Its central element depicts a pharaoh in the shape of a sphinx. It is now on display in the jewellery room of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Earring, found in the tomb of Horemheb, Saqqara, Egypt. Its central element depicts a pharaoh in the shape of a sphinx. It is now on display in the jewellery room of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Anhai's wooden statuette of the god Osiris

Journey Through the Afterlife: Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead – review

Shawabti of King Senkamanisken Serpentinite, Nuri, Pyramid 3 (Tomb of Senkamanisken) 640–620 BC (Napatan Period)

Shawabti of King Senkamanisken Serpentinite, Nuri, Pyramid 3 (Tomb of Senkamanisken) 640–620 BC (Napatan Period)

Shawabty of King Taharqa-The ushabti (also called shabti or shawabti, with a number of variant spellings, Ancient Egyptian plural: ushabtiu) was a funerary figurine used in Ancient Egypt. Ushabtis were placed in tombs among the grave goods and were intended to act as substitutes for the deceased, should he/she be called upon to do manual labor in the afterlife. They were used from the Middle Kingdom (around 1900 BC) until the end of the Ptolemaic Period nearly 2000 years later.

Shawabty of King Taharqa-The ushabti (also called shabti or shawabti, with a number of variant spellings, Ancient Egyptian plural: ushabtiu) was a funerary figurine used in Ancient Egypt. Ushabtis were placed in tombs among the grave goods and were intended to act as substitutes for the deceased, should he/she be called upon to do manual labor in the afterlife. They were used from the Middle Kingdom (around 1900 BC) until the end of the Ptolemaic Period nearly 2000 years later.

Shawabti inscribed for the Chief of Miam, Heqanefer | Echoes of Egypt | Yale Peabody Museum. From his own tomb. Hekanefer also shown in tomb of (Amenhotep) Huy, Viceroy of Kush under Tutankhamun.

Shawabti inscribed for the Chief of Miam, Heqanefer | Echoes of Egypt | Yale Peabody Museum. From his own tomb. Hekanefer also shown in tomb of (Amenhotep) Huy, Viceroy of Kush under Tutankhamun.

Shabti of Siptah Period: New Kingdom, Ramesside Dynasty: Dynasty 19 Reign: reign of Siptah Date: ca. 1194–1188 B.C. Geography: From Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Valley of the Kings, Tomb of Siptah

Shabti of Siptah Period: New Kingdom, Ramesside Dynasty: Dynasty 19 Reign: reign of Siptah Date: ca. 1194–1188 B.C. Geography: From Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Valley of the Kings, Tomb of Siptah

Stone Shabti of Kha. TT8 at Deir el-Medina

Stone Shabti of Kha. TT8 at Deir el-Medina

Shawabty. Dated 664–525 B.C. Dimensions Height x width x depth: 20.7 x 5.3 x 4.3 cm (8 1/8 x 2 1/16 x 1 11/16 in.) Medium Faience Collections The Ancient World Classifications Tomb equipment Culture Egyptian Period Late Period, Dynasty 26–30

Shawabty. Dated 664–525 B.C. Dimensions Height x width x depth: 20.7 x 5.3 x 4.3 cm (8 1/8 x 2 1/16 x 1 11/16 in.) Medium Faience Collections The Ancient World Classifications Tomb equipment Culture Egyptian Period Late Period, Dynasty 26–30

A faience overseer shabti from the burial of Takeloth, found in the tomb of his father Prince Shoshenq, priest of Ptah at Memphis

A faience overseer shabti from the burial of Takeloth, found in the tomb of his father Prince Shoshenq, priest of Ptah at Memphis

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