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Definition of a Quaker Post Cards

Definition of a Quaker Post Cards

Quaker woman, 1860s. Emerging in the mid 1600s in Britain, the Society of Friends (or Quakers) were strongly influenced by Anabaptists -- most likely Dutch Mennonites via the English General Baptists. Friends adapted their teachings of Plainness, pacifism, and discipleship, as well as internal church organization.

Quaker woman, 1860s. Emerging in the mid 1600s in Britain, the Society of Friends (or Quakers) were strongly influenced by Anabaptists -- most likely Dutch Mennonites via the English General Baptists. Friends adapted their teachings of Plainness, pacifism, and discipleship, as well as internal church organization.

How Quakers changed Ireland  . . .Low-key group celebrate history. Dressed for the part: Amy Mooney, Agnes Conroy and Roisin Dempsey in Quaker costume preparing for the opening of the exhibition of the Quake...

How Quakers changed Ireland . . .Low-key group celebrate history. Dressed for the part: Amy Mooney, Agnes Conroy and Roisin Dempsey in Quaker costume preparing for the opening of the exhibition of the Quake...

sometimes shaken, often stirred Mousepad Quakers..sometimes shaken, often stirred...

sometimes shaken, often stirred Mousepad

sometimes shaken, often stirred Mousepad Quakers..sometimes shaken, often stirred...

The London Quaker. A woodcut print of a woman, entitled 'The London Quaker'. It is from 'The Cryes of the City of London' numbered 45, published by Robert Sayer, c.1760. MoL 003250

The London Quaker. A woodcut print of a woman, entitled 'The London Quaker'. It is from 'The Cryes of the City of London' numbered 45, published by Robert Sayer, c.1760. MoL 003250

Quakers, believed that a boycott of sugar, which was one of Britain’s major imports, would help to make people aware of the suffering of slaves. Inspired, women’s societies put out boycott pamphlets and started to compile a national list of all those who had given up West Indian sugar.

Quakers, believed that a boycott of sugar, which was one of Britain’s major imports, would help to make people aware of the suffering of slaves. Inspired, women’s societies put out boycott pamphlets and started to compile a national list of all those who had given up West Indian sugar.

Strength in Weakness: Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women. would love to read this book

Strength in Weakness: Writings of Eighteenth-Century Quaker Women. would love to read this book

Quaker bumper sticker

Quaker bumper sticker

Car Bumper Stickers,Ruler

Quaker Emergency Post Cards

Quaker Emergency Postcard

Quaker Emergency Post Cards

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