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SHIGA, Shigeo (1928-2011) Stoneware Wide Neck Vase. Oribe with running ash glaze, potter's personal seals to foot.

SHIGA, Shigeo (1928-2011) Stoneware Wide Neck Vase. Oribe with running ash glaze, potter's personal seals to foot.

Shigeo Shiga, Pale Blue Pot,… - Australian Studio Ceramics, Art And Design 20/21 C Design - Shapiro Auctioneers - Antiques Reporter

Shigeo Shiga, Pale Blue Pot,… - Australian Studio Ceramics, Art And Design 20/21 C Design - Shapiro Auctioneers - Antiques Reporter

Water Jar, Shigaraki, 16th century (This style of water container is used in the ceremony to old the cold water)

Water Jar, Shigaraki, 16th century (This style of water container is used in the ceremony to old the cold water)

Shiga ware cylindrical tea bowl in Oribe style 18th-19th century   Edo period  Stoneware with iron glaze and black enamel over clear glaze H: 8.7 W: 9.1 D: 9.1 cm Tsushima island, Japan

Shiga ware cylindrical tea bowl in Oribe style 18th-19th century Edo period Stoneware with iron glaze and black enamel over clear glaze H: 8.7 W: 9.1 D: 9.1 cm Tsushima island, Japan

Google Image Result for http://www.australianpotteryatbemboka.com.au/shop/images/products/coffee-tea/pots/1920l.jpg

Google Image Result for http://www.australianpotteryatbemboka.com.au/shop/images/products/coffee-tea/pots/1920l.jpg

Shigaraki ware is slow wood-fired stoneware from Shiga prefecture where its kiln is known for one of the six ancient kilns in Japan. These six kilns have been actively producing as the center of Japanese pottery since the end of 12th century. In the early times of Shigaraki ware, seed pots and other stoneware involving farming were made often so it was rather natural that the farmers at the time inherited the techniques to produce on the off season from farms.

Shigaraki ware is slow wood-fired stoneware from Shiga prefecture where its kiln is known for one of the six ancient kilns in Japan. These six kilns have been actively producing as the center of Japanese pottery since the end of 12th century. In the early times of Shigaraki ware, seed pots and other stoneware involving farming were made often so it was rather natural that the farmers at the time inherited the techniques to produce on the off season from farms.

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