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June 15, 2015 To the human eye, Mercury may resemble a dull, grey orb but this enhanced-colour image from NASA’s Messengerprobe, tells a completely different story. Swathes of iridescent blue, sandy-coloured plains and delicate strands of greyish white, create an ethereal and colourful view of our Solar System’s innermost planet. These contrasting colours have been chosen to emphasise the differences in the composition of the landscape across the planet. The darker regions…

June 15, 2015 To the human eye, Mercury may resemble a dull, grey orb but this enhanced-colour image from NASA’s Messengerprobe, tells a completely different story. Swathes of iridescent blue, sandy-coloured plains and delicate strands of greyish white, create an ethereal and colourful view of our Solar System’s innermost planet. These contrasting colours have been chosen to emphasise the differences in the composition of the landscape across the planet. The darker regions…

Hubble Watches Super Star Create Holiday Light Show

This festive NASA Hubble Space Telescope image resembles a holiday wreath made of sparkling lights. The bright southern hemisphere star RS Puppis, at the center of the image, is swaddled in a gossamer cocoon of reflective dust illuminated by the.

Wolf-Rayet Nebula is a nebula which surrounds a Wolf-Rayet star. There are different types of WR-nebula, based on their formation mechanism: 1.HII regions 2.ejecta-type nebulae 3.wind-blown bubbles 4.neutral hydrogen voids and shells (may be associated gas). The nebula shown is a 'wind-blown bubbles' type.

Wolf-Rayet Nebula is a nebula which surrounds a Wolf-Rayet star. There are different types of WR-nebula, based on their formation mechanism: 1.HII regions 2.ejecta-type nebulae 3.wind-blown bubbles 4.neutral hydrogen voids and shells (may be associated gas). The nebula shown is a 'wind-blown bubbles' type.

The Black Eye Galaxy (also called Sleeping Beauty Galaxy; designated M64)  absorbed a satellite galaxy that collided with it, perhaps more than one billion years ago. Active formation of new stars is occurring in the shear region where the oppositely rotating gases collide, are compressed, and contract. It is approximately 17 million light years from Earth. The inner region has a radius of only approximately 3,000 light-years, while the outer section extends another 40,000 light-years.

The Black Eye Galaxy (also called Sleeping Beauty Galaxy; designated M64) absorbed a satellite galaxy that collided with it, perhaps more than one billion years ago. Active formation of new stars is occurring in the shear region where the oppositely rotating gases collide, are compressed, and contract. It is approximately 17 million light years from Earth. The inner region has a radius of only approximately 3,000 light-years, while the outer section extends another 40,000 light-years.

The Pelican Nebula (IC 5067/5070) an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus, by Don Bryden #summerstargazing

The Pelican Nebula (IC 5067/5070) an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus, by Don Bryden #summerstargazing

Crater and Basaltic Rock on Mars

Crater and Basaltic Rock on Mars. Crater and basaltic rock.

Death Star: Eta Carinae, one of the closest stars to Earth is huge and unstable and will likely explode in a supernova in the relatively 'near future' (On an astronomical timeline this could be a million years from now). via NASA  #Eta_Carinae #Supernova #NASA

Death Star: Eta Carinae, one of the closest stars to Earth is huge and unstable and will likely explode in a supernova in the relatively 'near future' (On an astronomical timeline this could be a million years from now). via NASA #Eta_Carinae #Supernova #NASA

Resembling the puffs of smoke and sparks from a summer fireworks display in this image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, these delicate filaments are actually sheets of debris from a stellar explosion in a neighboring galaxy. Hubble's target was a supernova remnant within the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a nearby, small companion galaxy to the Milky Way visible from the southern hemisphere.

Resembling the puffs of smoke and sparks from a summer fireworks display in this image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, these delicate filaments are actually sheets of debris from a stellar explosion in a neighboring galaxy. Hubble's target was a supernova remnant within the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a nearby, small companion galaxy to the Milky Way visible from the southern hemisphere.

Most nebulae is widespread and that means that they are very large and do not have well-defined boundaries. In visible light, these nebulae can be divided in emission nebulae and reflection nebulae based on how you create the light we see. The emission nebulae contain ionized gas (mostly ionized hydrogen) that produces spectral lines of emission. They are often called H II regions derived from the language of the professional astronomers referring ionized hydrogen.

Most nebulae is widespread and that means that they are very large and do not have well-defined boundaries. In visible light, these nebulae can be divided in emission nebulae and reflection nebulae based on how you create the light we see. The emission nebulae contain ionized gas (mostly ionized hydrogen) that produces spectral lines of emission. They are often called H II regions derived from the language of the professional astronomers referring ionized hydrogen.

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