THON  The thon and rammana (Thai: โทนรำมะนา, pronounced [tʰoːn ram.ma.naː] are hand drums played as a pair in Thai classical music. It consists of two drums: the thon (โทน), a goblet drum with a ceramic or wooden body) and the rammana (รำมะนา), a small frame drum. They are used usually in the khruang sai ensemble. The thon gives a low pitch and the rammana gives a high pitch. Earlier in the 20th century, the thon and rammana were sometimes played separately.

THON The thon and rammana (Thai: โทนรำมะนา, pronounced [tʰoːn ram.ma.naː] are hand drums played as a pair in Thai classical music. It consists of two drums: the thon (โทน), a goblet drum with a ceramic or wooden body) and the rammana (รำมะนา), a small frame drum. They are used usually in the khruang sai ensemble. The thon gives a low pitch and the rammana gives a high pitch. Earlier in the 20th century, the thon and rammana were sometimes played separately.

JING The jing is a large gong used in traditional Korean music, particularly in samul nori, pungmul, and daechwita. Usually made from brass, it is struck by a hammer that is layered with soft cloth to smoothen the texture of the sound produced. It is typically played at the onset of ceremonies and special occasions. It is struck with a large, padded stick and drops in pitch slightly when struck firmly.  Its name was originally pronounced jeong (정, deriving from the Sino-Korean 鉦).

JING The jing is a large gong used in traditional Korean music, particularly in samul nori, pungmul, and daechwita. Usually made from brass, it is struck by a hammer that is layered with soft cloth to smoothen the texture of the sound produced. It is typically played at the onset of ceremonies and special occasions. It is struck with a large, padded stick and drops in pitch slightly when struck firmly. Its name was originally pronounced jeong (정, deriving from the Sino-Korean 鉦).

KEYBOARDS I (left /right, up/ down)   1.- Orphika: chordophone / zither family. 2.- Clavichord: chordophone / zither family 3.- Spinet: chordophone / zither family 4.-Geigen werk: chordophone / zither family

KEYBOARDS I (left /right, up/ down) 1.- Orphika: chordophone / zither family. 2.- Clavichord: chordophone / zither family 3.- Spinet: chordophone / zither family 4.-Geigen werk: chordophone / zither family

MEMBRANÓFONOS (single head drum). Left/ Right, Up/Down    1.-Timbales: membranophone / drum 2.- Congas: membranophone / drum (Latin America). 3.-  4.- Bongo: membranophone / drum. 5.- Caja (vallenato) 6.- Tabla: India (Asia) 7.- Bayan: India (Asia) 8.- Khanjira 9.- Darbouka : Iran (Arabia)  10.- Tombak : Arabia 11.- Djembe : Africa 12.- Thon: Thailand (Asia) 13.- Rammana: Thailand (Asia) 14.- Kundu : Papua (New Guinea) 15.- Tbilat : Morocco (Africa) 16.- Kettledrums: Europe

MEMBRANÓFONOS (single head drum). Left/ Right, Up/Down 1.-Timbales: membranophone / drum 2.- Congas: membranophone / drum (Latin America). 3.- 4.- Bongo: membranophone / drum. 5.- Caja (vallenato) 6.- Tabla: India (Asia) 7.- Bayan: India (Asia) 8.- Khanjira 9.- Darbouka : Iran (Arabia) 10.- Tombak : Arabia 11.- Djembe : Africa 12.- Thon: Thailand (Asia) 13.- Rammana: Thailand (Asia) 14.- Kundu : Papua (New Guinea) 15.- Tbilat : Morocco (Africa) 16.- Kettledrums: Europe

EGIPTO (Up/Down, left to right)   1.-Rabab: chordophone / bowed string instrument  2.- Sistrum, Idiophone. 3.- Sistrum, Idiophone 4.-Arghul, aerophone / single reed (Egypt, North-africa)

EGIPTO (Up/Down, left to right) 1.-Rabab: chordophone / bowed string instrument 2.- Sistrum, Idiophone. 3.- Sistrum, Idiophone 4.-Arghul, aerophone / single reed (Egypt, North-africa)

ENKULURAI The keluri or keledi, and the enkulurai are extremely rare bamboo free-reed mouth organs found in northwestern Borneo. These instruments bear a remarkable resemblance to the hulusheng, but contain 6 pipes instead of five and the pipes do not pierce the bottom of the gourd.  The keluri or keledi is played by the Orang Ulu or 'upriver people' of the interior of Borneo, and the enkulurai is played by the Iban people who live in the lowlands close to the coast.

ENKULURAI The keluri or keledi, and the enkulurai are extremely rare bamboo free-reed mouth organs found in northwestern Borneo. These instruments bear a remarkable resemblance to the hulusheng, but contain 6 pipes instead of five and the pipes do not pierce the bottom of the gourd. The keluri or keledi is played by the Orang Ulu or 'upriver people' of the interior of Borneo, and the enkulurai is played by the Iban people who live in the lowlands close to the coast.

ILLIMBA The ilimba is a lamellophone from Tanzania. It is a traditional instrument of the Gogo ethnic group and its most famous player in the 20th century was Hukwe Zawose, who developed a version of the instrument with between 66 and 72 metal keys.[1]  The instrument is similar to the Zimbabwean mbira but larger, and is tuned to intervals derived from the overtone series.

ILLIMBA The ilimba is a lamellophone from Tanzania. It is a traditional instrument of the Gogo ethnic group and its most famous player in the 20th century was Hukwe Zawose, who developed a version of the instrument with between 66 and 72 metal keys.[1] The instrument is similar to the Zimbabwean mbira but larger, and is tuned to intervals derived from the overtone series.

GHIJEK The Ghaychak or Ghijek is a round-bodied musical instrument with three or four metal strings and a short fretless neck. Ghijek is very popular throughout Central Asia. It is used by Iranians, Afghans, Uzbeks, Uyghurs, Tajiks, Turkmens

GHIJEK The Ghaychak or Ghijek is a round-bodied musical instrument with three or four metal strings and a short fretless neck. Ghijek is very popular throughout Central Asia. It is used by Iranians, Afghans, Uzbeks, Uyghurs, Tajiks, Turkmens

RABAB/ALJAZAIR  This instrument is a one-stringed fiddle.

RABAB/ALJAZAIR This instrument is a one-stringed fiddle.

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