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Girls (Eskimo) in potato field, 1910? – 1940?  | by Marquette University Archives

Girls (Eskimo) in potato field, 1910? – 1940? | by Marquette University Archives

Seven Clans. I am Bird Clan. For some, stating one's clan is not done because of the fear of conjuring; for others, clan is not stated because they believe that Christianity and traditional beliefs should never be mixed; for people like me, stating one's clan is acceptable because clan represents many values, including hospitality. I am a Christian Cherokee woman who is proud of clan.

The Seven Clans of the Cherokee

Seven Clans. I am Bird Clan. For some, stating one's clan is not done because of the fear of conjuring; for others, clan is not stated because they believe that Christianity and traditional beliefs should never be mixed; for people like me, stating one's clan is acceptable because clan represents many values, including hospitality. I am a Christian Cherokee woman who is proud of clan.

Children (Eskimo) by sign, "Please, Do not speak Eskimo," 1914  | by Marquette University Archives

Children (Eskimo) by sign, "Please, Do not speak Eskimo," 1914 | by Marquette University Archives

Format of original: glass negative : b&w ; 5" x 7" Photographer/Illustrator: Lomen Brothers, Nome, Alaska Remarks: Studio portrait. Hair braided, and baby asleep on her back. Subject(s): Inuit - Children / Inuit - Clothing / Inuit - Personalities / Inuit

Format of original: glass negative : b&w ; 5" x 7" Photographer/Illustrator: Lomen Brothers, Nome, Alaska Remarks: Studio portrait. Hair braided, and baby asleep on her back. Subject(s): Inuit - Children / Inuit - Clothing / Inuit - Personalities / Inuit

Princess Angeline, daughter of Chief Seattle. She was born in 1820 in what is now Rainier Beach. After the 1855 treaty that kicked all Native Americans out of Seattle, Angeline remained in a small waterfront cabin on Western Avenue, near what is now the Pike Place Market, selling handwoven baskets at Ye Olde Curiosity Shop.

Princess Angeline, daughter of Chief Seattle. She was born in 1820 in what is now Rainier Beach. After the 1855 treaty that kicked all Native Americans out of Seattle, Angeline remained in a small waterfront cabin on Western Avenue, near what is now the Pike Place Market, selling handwoven baskets at Ye Olde Curiosity Shop.

Attorney presenting Black Hills claim, 1923 | by Marquette University Archives

Attorney presenting Black Hills claim, 1923 | by Marquette University Archives

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