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WWII to 1950's USAF Flight Engineer wings.

WWII to 1950's USAF Flight Engineer wings.

One day, according to legend (and more than a few WWII glider pilots), several power plane pilots were ribbing a group of glidermen about the "G" in the center of their pilot's wings. "What's that stand for? Greenhorn? Grounded?" "No," answered one of the glidermen. "It stands for Guts!" And so was born the glider pilot's motto--a true testament to a rare breed of courageous aviators.

One day, according to legend (and more than a few WWII glider pilots), several power plane pilots were ribbing a group of glidermen about the "G" in the center of their pilot's wings. "What's that stand for? Greenhorn? Grounded?" "No," answered one of the glidermen. "It stands for Guts!" And so was born the glider pilot's motto--a true testament to a rare breed of courageous aviators.

1921-WWII US Airship Pilot Wings

1921-WWII US Airship Pilot Wings

WWI Pilot Wing design by Dan Dunham

WWI Pilot Wing design by Dan Dunham

War Eagles - during time of war American Colonels wore their rank with the head of the Eagle facing the arrows of war. This ended in the 1950's but still today I make them and while un-official many Col. still buy and wear them.

War Eagles - during time of war American Colonels wore their rank with the head of the Eagle facing the arrows of war. This ended in the 1950's but still today I make them and while un-official many Col. still buy and wear them.

WWII Command Pilot wing design by Josten.

WWII Command Pilot wing design by Josten.

Reproduction of the first Military Aviation wings issued in 1913.

Reproduction of the first Military Aviation wings issued in 1913.

Fokker Dr1 Triplanes of Jasta 26 at Erchlin, France in February 1918: one of the most famous aircraft of the war, since both Richthofen and Voss died flying them.  Although highly manoeuvrable it was not that fast, and also quite fragile - by the end of the war few remained in service, the Fokker DVII having largely superceded it.

Fokker Dr1 Triplanes of Jasta 26 at Erchlin, France in February 1918: one of the most famous aircraft of the war, since both Richthofen and Voss died flying them. Although highly manoeuvrable it was not that fast, and also quite fragile - by the end of the war few remained in service, the Fokker DVII having largely superceded it.

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