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These nanoparticles created by MIT engineers can act as synthetic biomarkers for disease. The particles (brown) are coated with peptides (blue) that are cleaved by enzymes (green) found at the disease site. The peptides then accumulate in the urine, where they can be detected using mass spectrometry.  Image: Justin H. Lo

These nanoparticles created by MIT engineers can act as synthetic biomarkers for disease. The particles (brown) are coated with peptides (blue) that are cleaved by enzymes (green) found at the disease site. The peptides then accumulate in the urine, where they can be detected using mass spectrometry. Image: Justin H. Lo

Study illuminates role of cancer drug decitabine in repairing damaged cells A Purdue University study sheds light on how cell damage is reversed by the cancer drug decitabine and identifies a potential biomarker that could indicate a patient's stage of cancer and response to treatment.

Study illuminates role of cancer drug decitabine in repairing damaged cells A Purdue University study sheds light on how cell damage is reversed by the cancer drug decitabine and identifies a potential biomarker that could indicate a patient's stage of cancer and response to treatment.

RFID Implants Found to Cause Cancer Tumors linked to cancer in laboratory animals, research reviewed by Associated Press. The evidence is strong enough to convince many researchers that more research is needed before any more human implantation takes place.

RFID Implants Found to Cause Cancer Tumors linked to cancer in laboratory animals, research reviewed by Associated Press. The evidence is strong enough to convince many researchers that more research is needed before any more human implantation takes place.

"Rice-Cell Cocktail Tough On Cancer Cells, Nice to Normal Cells  Jan. 22, 2013 — Juice from rice cells can knock out two kinds of human cancer cells as well or better than the potent anti-cancer drug Taxol, a Michigan Technological University scientist has discovered in laboratory tests. Plus, it does something Taxol can't do: it plays nice with normal cells...the rice callus culture may be attacking cancer with the same sort of plant chemicals that make vegetables so healthy to eat..."

"Rice-Cell Cocktail Tough On Cancer Cells, Nice to Normal Cells Jan. 22, 2013 — Juice from rice cells can knock out two kinds of human cancer cells as well or better than the potent anti-cancer drug Taxol, a Michigan Technological University scientist has discovered in laboratory tests. Plus, it does something Taxol can't do: it plays nice with normal cells...the rice callus culture may be attacking cancer with the same sort of plant chemicals that make vegetables so healthy to eat..."

Dr Brandon Aubrey, Dr Gemma Kelly and Dr Marco Herold adapted the technology, called CRISPR, to specifically mimic and study blood cancers. The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute has one of the most advanced CRISPR laboratories in Australia, established and led by Dr Herold.  Dr Aubrey, who is also a haematologist at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, said the team used the CRISPR technology to target and directly manipulate genes in blood cancer cells.  "Using preclinical models, we were able to…

Dr Brandon Aubrey, Dr Gemma Kelly and Dr Marco Herold adapted the technology, called CRISPR, to specifically mimic and study blood cancers. The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute has one of the most advanced CRISPR laboratories in Australia, established and led by Dr Herold. Dr Aubrey, who is also a haematologist at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, said the team used the CRISPR technology to target and directly manipulate genes in blood cancer cells. "Using preclinical models, we were able to…

Chinese scientists have become the first to test out the revolutionary CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology in a human cancer patient.

Chinese scientists have become the first to test out the revolutionary CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology in a human cancer patient.

Tshililo Michael Masutha, South Africa’s deputy minister of science and technology, participates in cutting the ribbon during the opening ceremony of  the Cape Town HVTN Immunology Laboratory on Oct. 23, 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa. Photo by Robert Hood, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Tshililo Michael Masutha, South Africa’s deputy minister of science and technology, participates in cutting the ribbon during the opening ceremony of the Cape Town HVTN Immunology Laboratory on Oct. 23, 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa. Photo by Robert Hood, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

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