Waste Lands America's forgotten nuclear legacy: During the build-up to the Cold War, the U.S. government called upon hundreds of factories and research centers to help develop nuclear weapons and other forms of atomic energy. At many sites, this work left behind residual radioactive contamination requiring government cleanups, but the government's own records about many of the sites unclear. The Journal compiled a database to trace this historic atomic development effort and its…

Waste Lands America's forgotten nuclear legacy: During the build-up to the Cold War, the U.S. government called upon hundreds of factories and research centers to help develop nuclear weapons and other forms of atomic energy. At many sites, this work left behind residual radioactive contamination requiring government cleanups, but the government's own records about many of the sites unclear. The Journal compiled a database to trace this historic atomic development effort and its…

When Sub Goes Silent, Who Has Control of Its Nuclear Warheads? China’s growing fleet of nuclear-missile submarines poses a delicate question: Can a highly centralized communist system entrust a submarine commander to carry nuclear weapons far from China’s shores? A Cold War episode illustrates the risks - a diesel-powered Soviet sub, the B-59, in the Sargasso Sea.

When Sub Goes Silent, Who Has Control of Its Nuclear Warheads?

When Sub Goes Silent, Who Has Control of Its Nuclear Warheads? China’s growing fleet of nuclear-missile submarines poses a delicate question: Can a highly centralized communist system entrust a submarine commander to carry nuclear weapons far from China’s shores? A Cold War episode illustrates the risks - a diesel-powered Soviet sub, the B-59, in the Sargasso Sea.

If nuclear war broke out where's the safest place on Earth? Ex-Pentagon chief William Perry claimed this year that nuclear destruction is a bigger risk today than during the 70s and 80s. The shock election of Donald Trump, described by US military officers as ‘easily baited and quick to lash out’, has also revived our atomic anxiety. With Donald soon to be in sole command of 7,000 nuclear warheads, are we one step closer to nuclear annihilation?

If nuclear war broke out where's the safest place on Earth?

If nuclear war broke out where's the safest place on Earth? Ex-Pentagon chief William Perry claimed this year that nuclear destruction is a bigger risk today than during the 70s and 80s. The shock election of Donald Trump, described by US military officers as ‘easily baited and quick to lash out’, has also revived our atomic anxiety. With Donald soon to be in sole command of 7,000 nuclear warheads, are we one step closer to nuclear annihilation?

Japan's government committed to nuclear power despite Fukushima disaster: With the pull of a lever, control rods were lifted Tuesday from the reactor core at a plant in southern Japan, ending a ban on nuclear power following meltdowns at Fukushima in the northeast that forced tens of thousands of people to leave their homes, most of them for good. Former Prime Minister Naoto Kan was in office at the time of the 2011 Fukushima accident, which was triggered by a massive earthquake and tsunami…

Japan's government committed to nuclear power despite Fukushima disaster: With the pull of a lever, control rods were lifted Tuesday from the reactor core at a plant in southern Japan, ending a ban on nuclear power following meltdowns at Fukushima in the northeast that forced tens of thousands of people to leave their homes, most of them for good. Former Prime Minister Naoto Kan was in office at the time of the 2011 Fukushima accident, which was triggered by a massive earthquake and tsunami…

Most communities don't want nuclear waste and that's causing a national crisis. New York sued the federal government and 17 other states joined. The resulting Supreme Court decision held that non-compact states could not be forced to take responsibility for their own waste. States no longer had final responsibility over low-level waste. Instead, that responsibility fell to the generators of the waste (mostly nuclear power plants).Three decades later, the system is an incoherent mess.

Most communities don't want nuclear waste and that's causing a national crisis. New York sued the federal government and 17 other states joined. The resulting Supreme Court decision held that non-compact states could not be forced to take responsibility for their own waste. States no longer had final responsibility over low-level waste. Instead, that responsibility fell to the generators of the waste (mostly nuclear power plants).Three decades later, the system is an incoherent mess.

Cash-strapped Japan Atomic Power Co. still donated 1.54 billion yen ($13.7 million) to a city government and asked that the funds be kept secret. The money used for the donations came from fees paid by other power companies, who are under contract to buy electricity from Japan Atomic Power which has not produced any electricity from its 3 nuclear reactors since 2011. Why is it still receiving money from the industry for nonexistent electricity??

Cash-strapped Japan Atomic Power Co. still donated 1.54 billion yen ($13.7 million) to a city government and asked that the funds be kept secret. The money used for the donations came from fees paid by other power companies, who are under contract to buy electricity from Japan Atomic Power which has not produced any electricity from its 3 nuclear reactors since 2011. Why is it still receiving money from the industry for nonexistent electricity??

The original tree at Zenpukuji Temple in Tokyo is 1200 years old. It also survived a bomb in the 2nd World War and still has a big black scar running down its side. Zenpukuji was the site of the first US Consulate in Tokyo.  http://www.unitar.org/greenlegacyhiroshima

The original tree at Zenpukuji Temple in Tokyo is 1200 years old. It also survived a bomb in the 2nd World War and still has a big black scar running down its side. Zenpukuji was the site of the first US Consulate in Tokyo. http://www.unitar.org/greenlegacyhiroshima

Karen Nickel believes she developed Lupus from exposure to the toxic materials dumped in her community. Lupus causes a patient’s immune system to turn on its own body, attacking healthy joint and organ tissues. It is most common in middle-aged women such as Nickel, but has recently been linked to exposure to uranium. That’s what Nickel thinks caused her lupus. She’s since found out that at least three other people from her childhood neighborhood also have the disease. They all grew up in a…

Karen Nickel believes she developed Lupus from exposure to the toxic materials dumped in her community. Lupus causes a patient’s immune system to turn on its own body, attacking healthy joint and organ tissues. It is most common in middle-aged women such as Nickel, but has recently been linked to exposure to uranium. That’s what Nickel thinks caused her lupus. She’s since found out that at least three other people from her childhood neighborhood also have the disease. They all grew up in a…

Workers began building interim facilities near the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant to store contaminated soil and other waste gathered during cleanup work across Fukushima Prefecture. The dump will cover around 16 sq. km and will be able to hold around 30 million tons of soil and other waste such as radioactive ash. It will not receive waste generated from the plant itself. Construction has been delayed due to the difficulty of obtaining agreement from municipalities and local…

Work begins on interim soil dump near Fukushima No. 1

Workers began building interim facilities near the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant to store contaminated soil and other waste gathered during cleanup work across Fukushima Prefecture. The dump will cover around 16 sq. km and will be able to hold around 30 million tons of soil and other waste such as radioactive ash. It will not receive waste generated from the plant itself. Construction has been delayed due to the difficulty of obtaining agreement from municipalities and local…

Most communities don't want nuclear waste and that's causing a national crisis. “If you look at a map of nuclear power plants, basically each of those is also a nuclear waste repository.” “Most of them are in metropolitan areas.” The national holding pattern on nuclear waste management has come at a steep cost. The federal government has paid nuclear plants some $5 billion in compensation for their "temporary" storage costs. The Department of Energy expects to pay at least $22 billion...

Most communities don't want nuclear waste and that's causing a national crisis. “If you look at a map of nuclear power plants, basically each of those is also a nuclear waste repository.” “Most of them are in metropolitan areas.” The national holding pattern on nuclear waste management has come at a steep cost. The federal government has paid nuclear plants some $5 billion in compensation for their "temporary" storage costs. The Department of Energy expects to pay at least $22 billion...

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