Explore Bandolier Bags Floral, Bag Bandolier and more!

Late 19th century Ojibway (First Nations) Bandolier bag at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia - From the curators' comments: "The beaded bags were made by women but typically worn by men for ceremonial occasions. Although sometimes used as bags, they were more important as symbols of wealth and status and were highly valued when trading with other tribes."

Late 19th century Ojibway (First Nations) Bandolier bag at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia - From the curators' comments: "The beaded bags were made by women but typically worn by men for ceremonial occasions. Although sometimes used as bags, they were more important as symbols of wealth and status and were highly valued when trading with other tribes."

Loom-beaded bandolier bag, Ojibwe, Great Lakes region, late nineteenth century. 	Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American Indians of the Great Lakes region used beads and cloth acquired through trade with Anglo Americans to create a new form--the bandolier bag. Made by women but typically worn by men as part of their ceremonial dress, these vividly colored and elaborately beaded bags were symbols of both personal status and tribal identity.

Loom-beaded bandolier bag, Ojibwe, Great Lakes region, late nineteenth century. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, American Indians of the Great Lakes region used beads and cloth acquired through trade with Anglo Americans to create a new form--the bandolier bag. Made by women but typically worn by men as part of their ceremonial dress, these vividly colored and elaborately beaded bags were symbols of both personal status and tribal identity.

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