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from CNT

5 Ways of Looking at China's Forbidden City

The Forbidden City was the Chinese imperial palace from the Ming Dynasty to the end of the Qing Dynasty. It is located in the middle of Beijing, China, and now houses the Palace Museum. Built in 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings and covers 720,000 m2 (7,800,000 sq ft).

from the Guardian

Maleonn's mobile photo studio - in pictures

Shanghai-based artist Maleonn has travelled around 25 Chinese provinces, photographing 200,000 people in a mobile photo studio. He established a set of guidelines, such as a minimum of eight people per city who would provide him and his team with food, somewhere to stay and a space to work. The subjects dressed either in clothes from Maleonn’s van or brought their own outfits.

The unique sense of place found within this ethnic enclave comes not only from the architecture and compact street grid but a cultural identity that has persevered for more than 160 years. Despite its reputation as a tourist attraction — it is San Francisco's third most-popular visitor destination — Chinatown is an immigrant gateway and cultural capital, a touchstone for Chinese throughout America as well as the 150,000–plus San Franciscans of Chinese heritage.

from About.com Travel

Going Beyond the Vermillion Walls: China's Forbidden City

Possibly the most popular tourist attraction in China, Forbidden City covers 720,000 square meters, including 800 buildings and more than 8,000 rooms..

The Forbidden City was the Chinese imperial palace from the Ming Dynasty to the end of the Qing Dynasty. It is located in the centre of Beijing, China, and now houses the Palace Museum. For almost 500 years, it served as the home of emperors and their households, as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government. Built in 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings and covers 720,000 m2 (7,800,000 sq ft) (Text from Wikipedia)

from Vimeo

WE ARE TRAVELING - Teaser

18.000 kilometers, 10 month, 15 countries, two cyclists and one aim: Asia! From Germany to China by bike.

As noted above, paper was an early invention of China. One of the first recorded accounts of using hygienic paper was during the Sui Dynasty in 589. In 851 an Arab traveler reported (with some amazement) that the Chinese used paper in place of water to cleanse themselves. By the late 1300’s, approximately 720,000 sheets per year was produced in packages of 1,000 to 10,000 sheets. In colonial times in America (late 1700’s) it was still common to use corn-cobs or leaves. Commercial toilet…