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By astrophotographer Thierry Legault - Solar eruption on June 6 2005 - with Takahashi TOA-130 refractor, H-alpha Daystar filter, STL-11000M CCD camera.

By astrophotographer Thierry Legault - Solar eruption on June 6 2005 - with Takahashi TOA-130 refractor, H-alpha Daystar filter, STL-11000M CCD camera.

Record-Breaking Star Explosion Is Most Powerful Ever Seen - On April 27, NASA's Swift Space Telescope and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope spotted the highest-energy gamma-ray burst (GRB) — an explosion of a massive star in the last stage of its life — ever before seen.Gamma-ray bursts are the brightest explosions yet observed in the universe.Scientists are hoping to find a supernova within the area of the explosion in order to trace the gamma-ray burst back to its origins.

Record-Breaking Star Explosion Is Most Powerful Ever Seen - On April 27, NASA's Swift Space Telescope and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope spotted the highest-energy gamma-ray burst (GRB) — an explosion of a massive star in the last stage of its life — ever before seen.Gamma-ray bursts are the brightest explosions yet observed in the universe.Scientists are hoping to find a supernova within the area of the explosion in order to trace the gamma-ray burst back to its origins.

Yesterday, the Sun exhibited one of the longest filaments ever recorded. Visible as the dark streak just below the center in the featured image, the enormous filament extended across the face of the Sun a distance even longer than the Sun's radius -- over 700,000 kilometers. A filament is actually hot gas held aloft by the Sun's magnetic field.

Yesterday, the Sun exhibited one of the longest filaments ever recorded. Visible as the dark streak just below the center in the featured image, the enormous filament extended across the face of the Sun a distance even longer than the Sun's radius -- over 700,000 kilometers. A filament is actually hot gas held aloft by the Sun's magnetic field.

April 13, 2012 -- Astrophotographer Alan Friedman captured this gorgeous portrait of the sun on April 7 from his home in Buffalo, NY, using a backyard solar telescope and a new Grasshopper CCD camera by Point Grey Research. Viewed in a wavelength emitted by hydrogen alpha (Ha) the sun's surface details become visible, showing the complex texture of our home star's true face.

April 13, 2012 -- Astrophotographer Alan Friedman captured this gorgeous portrait of the sun on April 7 from his home in Buffalo, NY, using a backyard solar telescope and a new Grasshopper CCD camera by Point Grey Research. Viewed in a wavelength emitted by hydrogen alpha (Ha) the sun's surface details become visible, showing the complex texture of our home star's true face.

Yesterday, the Sun exhibited one of the longest filaments ever recorded. It may still be there today. Visible as the dark streak just below the center in the featured image, the enormous filament extended across the face of the Sun a distance even longer than the Sun's radius -- over 700,000 kilometers. A filament is actually hot gas held aloft by the Sun's magnetic field, so that viewed from the side it would appear as a raised prominence. The featured image shows the filament in light ...

Yesterday, the Sun exhibited one of the longest filaments ever recorded. It may still be there today. Visible as the dark streak just below the center in the featured image, the enormous filament extended across the face of the Sun a distance even longer than the Sun's radius -- over 700,000 kilometers. A filament is actually hot gas held aloft by the Sun's magnetic field, so that viewed from the side it would appear as a raised prominence. The featured image shows the filament in light ...

Antarctica from space (NASA) - this is far more hospitable than Mars. Mars would also be covered in ice

Antarctica from space (NASA) - this is far more hospitable than Mars. Mars would also be covered in ice

Station and Shuttle transit the Sun That’s no sunspot. On the upper right of the above image of the Sun, the dark patches are actually the International Space Station (ISS) and the Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-132.

Station and Shuttle transit the Sun That’s no sunspot. On the upper right of the above image of the Sun, the dark patches are actually the International Space Station (ISS) and the Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-132.

New research led by a Johns Hopkins mathematical physicist focuses on the “misbehavior” of magnetic fields in solar flares. In this image, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured an X1.2 class solar flare, peaking on May 15, 2013. Credit: NASA/SDO

New research led by a Johns Hopkins mathematical physicist focuses on the “misbehavior” of magnetic fields in solar flares. In this image, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured an X1.2 class solar flare, peaking on May 15, 2013. Credit: NASA/SDO

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