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By astrophotographer Thierry Legault - Solar eruption on June 6 2005 - with Takahashi TOA-130 refractor, H-alpha Daystar filter, STL-11000M CCD camera.

By astrophotographer Thierry Legault - Solar eruption on June 6 2005 - with Takahashi TOA-130 refractor, H-alpha Daystar filter, STL-11000M CCD camera.

Live cameras on board #LDSD are on! Watch at http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 . Drop & rocket firing at  2:35pm PT.

Live cameras on board #LDSD are on! Watch at http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 . Drop & rocket firing at 2:35pm PT.

Holiday lights on the sun! A significant solar flare erupted on Dec 19: [video] http://youtu.be/BvyA6JwddPQ @NASASunEarth

Holiday lights on the sun! A significant solar flare erupted on Dec 19: [video] http://youtu.be/BvyA6JwddPQ @NASASunEarth

On June 27, 2015, NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, mission will celebrate its second year in space. IRIS observations have advanced our understanding of what role the interface region, which lies between the sun's photosphere and corona, plays in powering its dynamic million-degree atmosphere and driving the solar wind.

On June 27, 2015, NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, mission will celebrate its second year in space. IRIS observations have advanced our understanding of what role the interface region, which lies between the sun's photosphere and corona, plays in powering its dynamic million-degree atmosphere and driving the solar wind.

NASA GISS: Research Projects & Groups: Astrobiology - Snow and Sea Ice coverage from a Sturtian (~715 Mya) "Snowball Earth" simulation. Forcings applied include a reduction of solar insolation to 94% of modern and 40 ppm CO2). The position of the sea ice front is approximately stable by year 500, suggesting that a "hard snowball" solution (i.e., total Earth sea ice cover) may not be achievable for this particular set of climate forcings.

NASA GISS: Research Projects & Groups: Astrobiology - Snow and Sea Ice coverage from a Sturtian (~715 Mya) "Snowball Earth" simulation. Forcings applied include a reduction of solar insolation to 94% of modern and 40 ppm CO2). The position of the sea ice front is approximately stable by year 500, suggesting that a "hard snowball" solution (i.e., total Earth sea ice cover) may not be achievable for this particular set of climate forcings.

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