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Water Itself,Michael O'Keefe

How to Turn Water into Anti-Gravity Water

How to Turn Water into Anti-Gravity Water: Water has an extremely high surface tension. Under the right conditions, it sticks to itself more strongly than gravity acts to pull it down.

A photographer in Russia who goes by Fox Grom has captured some stunning images of his Siberian Huskies playing on a thawing frozen lake, which makes them seem like they’re walking on a giant mirror or on the sky itself. Grom lives in Kirovsk in Murmansk Oblast, which is one of Russia’s northernmost regions. Almost the entire area is north of the Arctic circle, meaning that his hardy dogs are no strangers to the cold. The lake is frozen solid but not completely so, and the thin film of…

A photographer in Russia who goes by Fox Grom has captured some stunning images of his Siberian Huskies playing on a thawing frozen lake, which makes them seem like they’re walking on a giant mirror or on the sky itself. Grom lives in Kirovsk in Murmansk Oblast, which is one of Russia’s northernmost regions. Almost the entire area is north of the Arctic circle, meaning that his hardy dogs are no strangers to the cold. The lake is frozen solid but not completely so, and the thin film of…

No other book I’ve read conveys passion more clearly than Like Water for Chocolate. It is the plot’s driving force, it is a character in and of itself, and it’s ultimately powerful enough to set whole towns ablaze. Via: BU Culture Shock

We all feel that connection with the moon any time we look up at night, but we have been taught not to acknowledge it, that it is un-natural - this is a travesty. The Mother in her full moon guise and the Maiden/Crone in their crescent guises, call to our natural instincts, instilled in us during creation, we must listen. She (not the moon itself - but the Creative Source) is our Mother Creator & Father Creator, they exist - have always existed, will always exist.

Piglet Squid (Helicocranchia pfefferi), so-named because of its rotund shape, which comes from its habit of filling itself up with water. They are roughly the size of a small avocado, and common in the deep, dark waters of virtually all of our oceans, living at depths of around 100m/320ft.