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Fiddler crab, Portland Bight, Jamaica.

Fiddler crab, Portland Bight, Jamaica.

Look in the dictionary under pugnacious and you will find a photograph of the fiddler crab.

Look in the dictionary under pugnacious and you will find a photograph of the fiddler crab.

Eleutherodactylus johnstonei, a species introduced to Jamaica and much of the Caribbean.

Eleutherodactylus johnstonei, a species introduced to Jamaica and much of the Caribbean.

Moneymusk Library in Amity Hall. The library is located within a brick windmill that was once the center of the sugar factory works. This is the only brick windmill in Jamaica - all other windmills were made of locally-quarried limestone.

Moneymusk Library in Amity Hall. The library is located within a brick windmill that was once the center of the sugar factory works. This is the only brick windmill in Jamaica - all other windmills were made of locally-quarried limestone.

Fiddler crab, Portland Bight, Jamaica.

Fiddler crab, Portland Bight, Jamaica.

One of the native fruits in the Cockpit region of Jamaica.

One of the native fruits in the Cockpit region of Jamaica.

Mangrove crab, Portland Bight, Jamaica.

Mangrove crab, Portland Bight, Jamaica.

Crab claw, Manatee Bay, Jamaica.

Crab claw, Manatee Bay, Jamaica.

The Jamaican Laughing Frog (Osteopilus brunneus) is a species of frog in the Hylidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, rural gardens, and heavily degraded former forest. More    Tadpoles of Jamaican laughing frog, Osteopilus brunneus, develop in a bromeliad's water deposit.

The Jamaican Laughing Frog (Osteopilus brunneus) is a species of frog in the Hylidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, rural gardens, and heavily degraded former forest. More Tadpoles of Jamaican laughing frog, Osteopilus brunneus, develop in a bromeliad's water deposit.

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