On September 22, 1950, Ralph Bunche received the Nobel Prize—the first African-American and the first person of color in the world to be so honored. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace for his successful mediation of a series of armistice agreements between the new nation of Israel and  its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. It remains the only time that all the parties to the Middle East conflict signed armistice agreements with Israel. #TodayInBlackHistory

On September 22, 1950, Ralph Bunche received the Nobel Prize—the first African-American and the first person of color in the world to be so honored. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace for his successful mediation of a series of armistice agreements between the new nation of Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. It remains the only time that all the parties to the Middle East conflict signed armistice agreements with Israel. #TodayInBlackHistory

July 25, 1972, US Government officials ADMITTED that African American's were used in a clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 in Tuskegee, Alabama by the U.S. Public Health Service to study the natural progression of untreated syphilis in poor, rural black men (THIS WAS KNOWN AS THE TUSKEGEE SYPHILIS EXPERIMENT). These men were told they were receiving free health care from the U.S. government.

July 25, 1972, US Government officials ADMITTED that African American's were used in a clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 in Tuskegee, Alabama by the U.S. Public Health Service to study the natural progression of untreated syphilis in poor, rural black men (THIS WAS KNOWN AS THE TUSKEGEE SYPHILIS EXPERIMENT). These men were told they were receiving free health care from the U.S. government.

Ralph J. Bunche, director of the UN Trusteeship division (and former professor of political science at Howard University), was awarded the Nobel Peace prize (September 22, 1950) for successful mediation of the Palestine conflict. He was the first African American to receive The Nobel Peace citation.

Ralph J. Bunche, director of the UN Trusteeship division (and former professor of political science at Howard University), was awarded the Nobel Peace prize (September 22, 1950) for successful mediation of the Palestine conflict. He was the first African American to receive The Nobel Peace citation.

Dr. Ralph J. Bunche was the first African-Descent American to win the Nobel Peace Prize, in 1950 for his efforts to make the United Nations an effective Conflict Free Conflict Resolution leader

Dr. Ralph J. Bunche was the first African-Descent American to win the Nobel Peace Prize, in 1950 for his efforts to make the United Nations an effective Conflict Free Conflict Resolution leader

August 2011 ~ Ralph Bunche was a diplomat and political scientist, who was the first person of color to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950. He was an excellent student and graduated from University of California, Berkeley and Harvard University. Bunche taught at Howard University and is mostly known for his work with the Arab-Israeli conflict in the 1940s.

August 2011 ~ Ralph Bunche was a diplomat and political scientist, who was the first person of color to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950. He was an excellent student and graduated from University of California, Berkeley and Harvard University. Bunche taught at Howard University and is mostly known for his work with the Arab-Israeli conflict in the 1940s.

Dr. Ralph Johnson Bunche ~ A Diplomat and first African  American "Nobel Peace Prize" winner ~ 1950

Dr. Ralph Johnson Bunche ~ A Diplomat and first African American "Nobel Peace Prize" winner ~ 1950

Mary McLeod Bethune, an educator and civil rights pioneer who founded the National Council of Negro Women and became the first African American woman to head a US federal agency when she led the Division of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration. A trusted adviser to both President Franklin Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt, she was not, however, the first African American woman to be pictured on a stamp. Any guesses on who that was?

Mary McLeod Bethune, an educator and civil rights pioneer who founded the National Council of Negro Women and became the first African American woman to head a US federal agency when she led the Division of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration. A trusted adviser to both President Franklin Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt, she was not, however, the first African American woman to be pictured on a stamp. Any guesses on who that was?

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