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White Head lighthouse [1852 - Whitehead Island, Maine, USA]

White Head lighthouse [1852 - Whitehead Island, Maine, USA]

Great Duck Island Lighthouse, Maine at Lighthousefriends.com

Great Duck Island Lighthouse, Maine at Lighthousefriends.com

Blue Hill Bay Lighthouse, Maine at Lighthousefriends.com

Blue Hill Bay Lighthouse, Maine at Lighthousefriends.com

According to an 1858 book on Camden history, the Richard family’s African cook pointed to the rocky seven-acre island with spruce trees and grass at the harbor’s entrance and pronounced it “his island.” It was subsequently known as Negro Island until it was renamed Curtis Island in 1934, for Cyrus Curtis, a summer resident of Camden and publishing magnate well known for his philanthropy.

According to an 1858 book on Camden history, the Richard family’s African cook pointed to the rocky seven-acre island with spruce trees and grass at the harbor’s entrance and pronounced it “his island.” It was subsequently known as Negro Island until it was renamed Curtis Island in 1934, for Cyrus Curtis, a summer resident of Camden and publishing magnate well known for his philanthropy.

Maine Lighthouses and Beyond: Heron Neck Lighthoouse

Maine Lighthouses and Beyond: Heron Neck Lighthoouse

Ram Island Lighthouse, Maine at Lighthousefriends.com

Ram Island Lighthouse, Maine at Lighthousefriends.com

Burnt Island Lighthouse Boothbay Harbor - Maine--right in front of the light is the "I think I've died and gone to Heaven bench."

Burnt Island Lighthouse Boothbay Harbor - Maine--right in front of the light is the "I think I've died and gone to Heaven bench."

Jaruel Marr was appointed keeper of the Hendricks Head Lighthouse in 1866 to compensate him in part for injuries he sustained while fighting in the Civil War. Jaruel had walked sixty miles to Portland to enlist in the Union Army, leaving his wife Catherine and three children behind. During the conflict, he was wounded and incarcerated in a Confederate prison in Virginia, where he was nursed back to health by a fellow-prisoner and Union Army doctor named Wolcott. To honor the doctor, Jaruel…

Jaruel Marr was appointed keeper of the Hendricks Head Lighthouse in 1866 to compensate him in part for injuries he sustained while fighting in the Civil War. Jaruel had walked sixty miles to Portland to enlist in the Union Army, leaving his wife Catherine and three children behind. During the conflict, he was wounded and incarcerated in a Confederate prison in Virginia, where he was nursed back to health by a fellow-prisoner and Union Army doctor named Wolcott. To honor the doctor, Jaruel…

turkey point lighthouse - Google Search

turkey point lighthouse - Google Search

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