Explore God Is, New York Times and more!

Sadie Stein contemplates textspeak in today’s “New York Times” crossword and, as God is her witness, argues against humble opinions.

Sadie Stein contemplates textspeak in today’s “New York Times” crossword and, as God is her witness, argues against humble opinions.

“Salsa, unlike boogaloo, is meant to sound not like a meeting point between Afro-Caribbean music and other styles, but like a compressed expression of Latino experience.”

Fania at Fifty

“Salsa, unlike boogaloo, is meant to sound not like a meeting point between Afro-Caribbean music and other styles, but like a compressed expression of Latino experience.”

Spurred by Downton Abbey, fabulously wealthy people around the world have decided they must have butlers, and they must have them now. Jeeves must be rolling in his grave—even if he was technically a valet, and a fictional one at that.

Butlers for Everyone, and Other News

Spurred by Downton Abbey, fabulously wealthy people around the world have decided they must have butlers, and they must have them now. Jeeves must be rolling in his grave—even if he was technically a valet, and a fictional one at that.

“The dust jacket intrigued me ... But it was not until I actually opened the book that I knew it must be mine.” Sadie Stein on Fredda Brilliant’s 1986 memoir-cum-art-book “Biographies in Bronze.”

Biographies in Bronze, by Fredda Brilliant

“The dust jacket intrigued me ... But it was not until I actually opened the book that I knew it must be mine.” Sadie Stein on Fredda Brilliant’s 1986 memoir-cum-art-book “Biographies in Bronze.”

"We have all heard the theories: OK is of Choctaw derivation, or possibly West African. Some linguists attribute it to the 'comical misspellings' craze of the 1830s, while others cite Martin Van Buren’s Old Kinderhook campaign, or attempts to lampoon Andrew Jackson as an illiterate who couldn’t manage 'all correct.'"

Are You Okay?

"We have all heard the theories: OK is of Choctaw derivation, or possibly West African. Some linguists attribute it to the 'comical misspellings' craze of the 1830s, while others cite Martin Van Buren’s Old Kinderhook campaign, or attempts to lampoon Andrew Jackson as an illiterate who couldn’t manage 'all correct.'"

“Maybe a new owner will like the minor key of its small mysteries. And why take on another life, if not for that?“ Sadie Stein on the dog that raced a Metro-North train.

The Cat Came Back

“Maybe a new owner will like the minor key of its small mysteries. And why take on another life, if not for that?“ Sadie Stein on the dog that raced a Metro-North train.

“Short of a degree in inorganic chemistry—or a bylaw prohibiting the inclusion of anything invented after, say, 1950—the game is nearly impossible.” Sadie Stein on the strange, slow demise of the classic guessing game.

Taxonomy

“Short of a degree in inorganic chemistry—or a bylaw prohibiting the inclusion of anything invented after, say, 1950—the game is nearly impossible.” Sadie Stein on the strange, slow demise of the classic guessing game.

A look back at the photography of the Bull City Summer series, now on view at Raleigh’s North Carolina Museum of Art. Photography: Leah Sobsey/Tim Telkamp, “Vince Belnome,” tintype. #baseball

Bull City Redux

A look back at the photography of the Bull City Summer series, now on view at Raleigh’s North Carolina Museum of Art. Photography: Leah Sobsey/Tim Telkamp, “Vince Belnome,” tintype. #baseball

“By selecting only the essential words and sentences, I see what I don’t need to talk about, where I don’t need to draw upon a tangent—I find all that matters.”

Staying Out of Trouble: An Interview with Julia Wertz

“By selecting only the essential words and sentences, I see what I don’t need to talk about, where I don’t need to draw upon a tangent—I find all that matters.”

“She brings an entirely new dimension to what has become, for modern readers, a portal into a world that feels impossibly distant.” Liana Finck illustrates the “Bintel Brief” advice column.

In Brief

“She brings an entirely new dimension to what has become, for modern readers, a portal into a world that feels impossibly distant.” Liana Finck illustrates the “Bintel Brief” advice column.

Pinterest
Search