Observation in science

Observation is essential in science. Scientists use observation to collect and record data, which enables them to construct and then test hypotheses and theories. Scientists observe in many ways – with their own senses or with tools such as microscopes, scanners or transmitters to extend their vision or hearing.
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DISCOVERING CELLS - VIDEO. Nobel prize winner, Sir Paul Nurse, explains how the invention of the microscope lead Robert Hooke to produce the first recorded observations of cells.

DISCOVERING CELLS - VIDEO. Nobel prize winner, Sir Paul Nurse, explains how the invention of the microscope lead Robert Hooke to produce the first recorded observations of cells.

EXPLORING WITH MICROSCOPES - RESOURCE SET. Microscopes let us view an invisible world – the objects around us that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. Learn more about how microscopes work and how they can shed light on plant structure, cells, earthquake processes and more.

EXPLORING WITH MICROSCOPES - RESOURCE SET. Microscopes let us view an invisible world – the objects around us that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. Learn more about how microscopes work and how they can shed light on plant structure, cells, earthquake processes and more.

OBSERVING WATER'S 'THIN SKIN' - STUDENT ACTIVITY. In this activity, students conduct a few simple activities to learn more about surface tension – a liquid’s thin ‘skin’.

OBSERVING WATER'S 'THIN SKIN' - STUDENT ACTIVITY. In this activity, students conduct a few simple activities to learn more about surface tension – a liquid’s thin ‘skin’.

Making sense of what we see  Professional development; Date: 08/12/16; Join Andrea Soanes and Lyn Rogers in this free online professional development session designed to inspire teachers to explore, with students, how to interpret and make sense of their observations. The focus is on how to utilise students’ prior learning and world views to make sense of the data they collect through observation.

Making sense of what we see Professional development; Date: 08/12/16; Join Andrea Soanes and Lyn Rogers in this free online professional development session designed to inspire teachers to explore, with students, how to interpret and make sense of their observations. The focus is on how to utilise students’ prior learning and world views to make sense of the data they collect through observation.

By the end of this activity, students should be able to: recognise that invertebrates are part of freshwater ecosystems; safely capture freshwater macroinvertebrates for observation; group macroinvertebrates according to observable features.

By the end of this activity, students should be able to: recognise that invertebrates are part of freshwater ecosystems; safely capture freshwater macroinvertebrates for observation; group macroinvertebrates according to observable features.

Live cams across the world - observation opportunities for the budding zoologists!

Live cams across the world - observation opportunities for the budding zoologists!

OBSERVING WATER - RESOURCE SET. A Material World resource for NZ Curriculum levels 1 and 2. Explore the characteristics of solids, liquids, gases and bubbles by observing water and its unusual properties.  Observation is an essential part of science. We use our senses to observe. Sometimes we extend our senses with tools like magnifying glasses, stethoscopes and satellites. Whatever methods we use, observations help us make sense of the world around us.

OBSERVING WATER - RESOURCE SET. A Material World resource for NZ Curriculum levels 1 and 2. Explore the characteristics of solids, liquids, gases and bubbles by observing water and its unusual properties. Observation is an essential part of science. We use our senses to observe. Sometimes we extend our senses with tools like magnifying glasses, stethoscopes and satellites. Whatever methods we use, observations help us make sense of the world around us.

OBSERVATION: LEARNING TO SEE, HARAKEKE - STUDENT ACTIVITY

OBSERVATION: LEARNING TO SEE, HARAKEKE - STUDENT ACTIVITY

In this activity, students discuss the importance of observation in science. They are given the opportunity to observe harakeke and record their observations. It is important to seek knowledge and understanding from your local iwi about the correct protocols and tikanga around harvesting and using harakeke.

In this activity, students discuss the importance of observation in science. They are given the opportunity to observe harakeke and record their observations. It is important to seek knowledge and understanding from your local iwi about the correct protocols and tikanga around harvesting and using harakeke.

OBSERVING SOIL DIFFERENCES - STUDENT ACTIVITY.

OBSERVING SOIL DIFFERENCES - STUDENT ACTIVITY.

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