nathan hastie
More ideas from nathan
Portable, powerful and made from natural material, this phone speaker projects the sound from your smartphone without the use of cords, batteries or a digital connection. Baltic birch plywood and a contrasting layer of walnut or mahogany are smoothed into an angled wedge shape, hollowed with a uniquely curved acoustic cone, amplifying sound with a warm, full tone.

Portable, powerful and made from natural material, this phone speaker projects the sound from your smartphone without the use of cords, batteries or a digital connection. Baltic birch plywood and a contrasting layer of walnut or mahogany are smoothed into an angled wedge shape, hollowed with a uniquely curved acoustic cone, amplifying sound with a warm, full tone.

World War I Recruitment Poster - The British Commonwealth in Arms - This poster depicts New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Newfoundland, and South Africa supporting Britain in arms. These British Dominions would eventually contribute more than 1.4 million service personnel to the British war effort from 1914 to 1918.  Source: Canadian War Museum/Musée canadien de la guerre (close-up available at source site)

World War I Recruitment Poster - The British Commonwealth in Arms - This poster depicts New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Newfoundland, and South Africa supporting Britain in arms. These British Dominions would eventually contribute more than 1.4 million service personnel to the British war effort from 1914 to 1918. Source: Canadian War Museum/Musée canadien de la guerre (close-up available at source site)

cartoons galli[poli - Google Search

cartoons galli[poli - Google Search

In the 1930s, after the Battle of Gallipoli, President Ataturk received a letter from the mothers of the fallen ANZAC soldiers requesting permission to visit the graves of their sons. In response he sat down and wrote this poignant letter to the women. Ataturk later used these same words in a speech to the first Australians, New Zealanders and British to visit the Gallipoli battlefields.

In the 1930s, after the Battle of Gallipoli, President Ataturk received a letter from the mothers of the fallen ANZAC soldiers requesting permission to visit the graves of their sons. In response he sat down and wrote this poignant letter to the women. Ataturk later used these same words in a speech to the first Australians, New Zealanders and British to visit the Gallipoli battlefields.